Best Practices In Education - Contents
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1: A Clear and Common Focus top

In high-performing schools, administrators, teachers, students, and parents share and commit to clearly articulated and understood common goals based on the fundamental belief that all students can learn and improve their performance.  There is clear evidence of school practices to support this belief. 

CT's Guide to Early Childhood Program Development

 

Summary:

Each year, Connecticut’s families enroll excited children in early childhood programs to embark on a wonderful learning opportunity. Recent compelling research about how preschoolers learn has helped educators recognize the influence of quality instruction on children’s development. The State Department of Education has created this Guide to Early Childhood Program Development to help stimulate this dynamic and essential experience for children.

Publication Date:2007
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Early/early_childhood_guide.pdf

Content Type:
Early Childhood
Grade Level:Pre-K, Elementary School
  
  
Early Childhood - Community of Practice
Summary:

To improve practice by: engaging in shared inquiry and learning with people who have a common goal, and implementing that learning. (external website)

URL:http://community.fpg.unc.edu/discussions/wiki-pd-approaches/community-of-practice.html
Content Type:
Early Childhood, Community of Practice
Grade Level:Pre-K, Elementary School
  
  
Data Walls
 

Many schools with a Clear and Common Focus make their goals and progress transparent to the community through the display of data walls and data graphs. Whether they are hand-drawn or computer-generated, these data displays show students, parents, teachers, and other community members the students’ progress toward greater achievement.

URL:

To see examples of data graphs, click on the link below:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/curriculum/cali/4ddtsampledatateamgraphs.pdf

For more information about how to create your own data walls, read the article located at this link:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/curriculum/cali/4fidtguidelinesdatawalls.pdf

  
Content Type:
Data walls
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Developing Quality Programs for Pupil Services: A Self-Evaluative Guide
Publication Date:

1999

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/QPPupilSrves.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, Pupil Services
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Best Practices for School Counseling in Connecticut
Publication Date:

2001

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/BestPractices.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, School Counseling
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT's Special Education Regulations
Publication Date:

2005

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/SpEd_Regs.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
Special Education, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT's Model Special Education Policy and Procedures Manual
Publication Date:

2007

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/PolicyProceduresManual.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
Special Education, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement
Summary:

Report on the Imperative for Professional Development in Education

In this publication, released by the Albert Shanker Institute in conjunction with a professional development forum cosponsored with Achieve, Inc. (see below), Harvard professor Richard Elmore argues that education reforms that are based on standards and accountability will fail unless policymakers also adopt a strategy to ensure that educators have the knowledge and skill they need to help students succeed. The bottom line, says Elmore, is not in issues of governance and process, but in how the quality of instructional practice affects student learning.

Publication Date:2002
URL:

http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/Bridging_Gap.pdf

Content Type:
Professional Development
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Promising Practices in CT Schools
Summary:

Promising Practices in CT Schools

Publication Date:Current
URL:

http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

Content Type:
Promising Practices in Schools
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Building a New Structure For School Leadership
Summary:

Public schools and schools systems, as they are presently constituted, are simply not led in ways that enable them to respond to the increasing demands they face under standardsbased reform. Further, if schools, school systems, and their leaders respond to standards based reforms the way they have responded to other attempts at broad scale reform of public education over the past century, they will fail massively and visibly, with an attendant loss of public confidence and serious consequences for public education. The way out of this problem is through the large scale improvement of instruction, something public education has been unable to do to date, but which is possible with dramatic changes in the way public schools define and practice leadership.

Publication Date:2000
URL:

http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/building.pdf

Content Type:
Staff Development, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development
Summary:

This Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development is designed to use multiple sources of data systematically collected by teachers and administrators, through the process of teacher evaluation and professional development. The school leader, in turn, analyzes this information and uses it as the basis of his/her own evaluation and professional development.

Publication Date:2006
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2653&q=320412

Content Type:
Staff Development, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
Summary:

Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
Summary:

Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Learning Community
Summary:

Schools that function successfully as professional learning communities are able to readily acclimate and respond to new policies and other changes. In a professional learning community, teachers and administrators (1) share a vision focused on student learning, (2) share leadership and decision making, and (3) work and learn together as they continually examine instructional practices — all of which are supported by strong personal and professional relationships, time for collaboration, and good communication.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_proflrncommfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Think outside the clock: Create time for professional learning.
Summary:

This article presents suggestions about creating staff development time in schools.  The author describes three ways a school district in Marietta, GA creatively found time for their  staff development, then also presents issues and suggestions offered by consultants who have worked with school systems on this issue. School administrators and teachers can use this article as a way to start discussions on finding staff development time in their schools.

Publication Date:2002
URL:http://www.nsdc.org/library/publications/tools/tools8-02rich.cfm
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
2: High Standards and Expectations top

High-performing schools show evidence that each teacher believes “all students can learn and I can teach them.”  Staff members are dedicated to helping every student achieve challenging state and local standards.  All students are engaged in an appropriately ambitious and rigorous course of study in which the high standards of performance are clear and consistent and the conditions for learning are modified and differentiated. This results in all students being prepared for success in the workplace, postsecondary education, and civic responsibilities.

A Guide to Common Core State Standards-Based IEPs

This multimedia presentation is designed to provide a tool and a process for helping Connecticut educators develop standards-based IEPs.

word bank screen shot

It is presented in three parts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you're having difficulty viewing the presentations, you'll need the most recent version of Adobe's Flash Player installed in your browser, and a broadband Internet connection.

Directions for the Tutorials


This presentation provides instruction on a tool that promotes the design of standards-based IEP goals and objectives.  This presentation can be used for individual, small group, or full staff professional development.  The training is broken up into three separate parts that are sectioned into components intended to be used sequentially.  Each module contains hands-on opportunities to apply the skills taught in the presentation.  The three parts can be viewed in either a single sitting or over several sittings.  If you choose to view them in a single sitting, the total recommended time for viewing the presentations and the completion of the hands-on activities is 3 hours.  If you choose to view them in more than one sitting, it is recommended that you plan to complete at least one part in its entirety within a sitting.  It is also recommended that each sitting occurs reasonably close in time to maintain the flow and continuity of the learning.  E.g., Part 1 is viewed on Monday; parts 2 and 3 are viewed on Tuesday.  Listed below are the recommended times for each part.


Part 1:  1 ½ hours

Part 2: ½ hour

Part 3: 1 hour

Before Using This Tutorial:

  • Select a specific student to use as a case study
  • Obtain a copy of the district curriculum or Common Core State Standards frameworks in any subject area, matching the grade level of the selected student; Click here for a copy of the Connecticut Frameworks.
  • Obtain a copy of the student’s IEP
  • Download the tool here

Tips for Selecting a Case Study:

  • Determine if a single student case study should be used across all groups or if multiple cases should be used
  • Select cases that relate to the grade levels of the participants
  • Select cases that represent the typical scenarios in your district (i.e., use a “Goldilocks” rule: not too easy, not too hard)
  • Consider using students who have attended the school or district in which the participants are employed
  • Consider having participants volunteer to select their own cases
  • Remember to respect confidentiality and the integrity of the IEP process; change names of students ahead of time and inform participants that all programming changes for any student must be done through the IEP process outside of this training

 

Suggestions for Group Use:

  • Planning Ahead
    • Select facilitators for the session relative to the size of the total audience
    • Preview the tutorials ahead of time to assist in the organization and planning
    • Plan sufficient time for viewing, completing the activities, and discussing learning
    • If viewing over multiple sessions, plan each sitting close in time, e.g. over three consecutive days
    • Provide participant learning objectives or a purpose for the training, along with a brief description of Word Bank and how the training will be organized prior to the session
    • Copy all materials needed ahead of time
    • Determine if CEUs will be offered through your district
  • Organizing Participants and Space
    • Consider the size of the group carefully, relative to space available and number of facilitators; this training has been done for up to 50 participants at a time
    • Organize participants in teams of 2 to 5 prior to the session and have each team work together
    • Use a comfortable space and seating for adults with sufficient room for the facilitators to be able to roam
  • Organizing the Viewing
    • Viewing Using a Computer Lab
      • Pre-load or set up each computer with the tutorials prior to the session
      • Determine how the session will be paced across the groups
      • Use only pairs or trios for participant groupings
      • Provide directions and timing to the whole group and then allow groups to work at their own pace
      • Facilitators should roam to assist the groups
    • Viewing Whole Group
      • Have an LCD projector and a screen to project the modules to allow for simultaneous viewing
      • Have an adequate sound system to allow for everyone to hear comfortably
      • Group participants in small teams of 3 to 5
      • Arrange the room with multiple tables with 3 to 5 chairs around each table
      • Have one main facilitator lead the directions and pacing
      • Have other facilitators roam to assist the groups
    • Alternative Ways to View
      • Study Groups
        • Pre-set groups of 3 to 5 participants to work together
        • Provide either a set timeframe for completion within which participants can schedule viewing times on their own or establish scheduled blocks of time that participants can use to view
        • Determine locations and arrangement for viewing; locations can be spread out
      • Multiple Small Groups in Different Locations at the Same Time
        • Assign a facilitator to lead each group
        • Provide the facilitators with directions and a preview prior to the session
        • Provide a set location, materials, and viewing arrangements for each small group
        • Provide a set starting and ending time
        • Have one or more facilitators roam across the multiple groups and locations during the scheduled sessions
Connecticut Preschool Assessment Framework
Summary:

The Connecticut Preschool Assessment Framework is a curriculum-embedded tool for assessing 3- and 4-year-old children in their preschool classrooms. It was developed as a companion to the Connecticut Preschool Curriculum Framework (1999) and articulates comprehensive performance standards or learning outcomes. These curriculum and assessment frameworks provide a system for using standards in both planning curricula and assessing children's progress. They enable teachers to plan and implement a curriculum that addresses specific learning standards and to observe and assess children's progress in achieving these standards. This system focuses curriculum planning on standards, or learning outcomes, rather than primarily on activities.

Publication Date:2008
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Early/Preschool_Assessment_Framework.pdf

Content Type:
Frameworks, Early Childhood, Assessment
Grade Level:Pre-K, Elementary School
  
  

 

Connecticut’s Preschool Curriculum Framework
Summary:

Connecticut’s Preschool Curriculum Framework was developed by the State Department of Education Bureau of Early Childhood Education and Social Services, with the assistance of the EASTCONN regional educational service center. This document incorporates information and perspectives from a wide array of resources.

Publication Date:2006
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Early/Preschool_framework.pdf

Content Type:
Frameworks, Early Childhood
Grade Level:Pre-K, Elementary School
  
  
Supporting Student Success By Building Resiliency Skills

Ruth D. Kirsch, Ph.D., LCSW

Children arrive at school with different “standard equipment”: abilities, skills, needs, and readiness to learn. For example, some students have few opportunities to develop the early skills that support reading success. An accompanying ISSS Brief, Vocabulary Instruction Through Stories and Expansion, explores some innovative approaches to help develop those skills. But student success is not limited to reading and math. In order to be successful in life, children must also develop healthy personal skills, both interpersonal (“plays well with others”) and intrapersonal -- those skills that are necessary to deal with adversity and promote emotional health. This Brief addresses the latter category: students’ ability to respond to life stressors, generally labeled coping or resiliency skills.

These skills start to develop early in life as an interaction of the infant’s temperament and the responsiveness of his or her environment, most especially the development of a secure, trusting attachment to a caregiver. Resiliency skills continue to develop and to be refined throughout one’s lifetime; they can be learned at any age. Often, resiliency is thought of as a “protective factor” since it tends to counteract, or mitigate against, “risk factors” such as biological compromises, development delays, emotional difficulties, poverty, and family circumstances. Resiliency is defined as the ability to maintain personal competency despite encountering adverse situations, misfortune, or stressful events. From a child’s perspective, resiliency might be described as:

  • I have
    • Trusting relationships with adults and friends
    • Rules and structure to my life
    • Parental (teacher) encouragement
  • I am
    • Loveable
    • Capable
  • I can
    • Do things well (academics, sports, computers, etc.)
    • Act independently
    • Make meaningful choices

Essential resiliency skills also serve to protect against a variety of adverse life outcomes: acting-out behavior (eg., bullying), substance abuse, sexual promiscuity and accompanying sexually transmitted diseases, depression, and suicide. To accomplish prevention, research recommends developing skills in self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making (Greenberg et al., 2001). Furthermore, research suggests that prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive programs designed to teach all of the skills, rather a program targeting one adverse outcome such as substance abuse.

Schools are an excellent place to foster healthy development in youngsters whether teaching the “Three Rs” or AP chemistry. Each adult can support resiliency development by

  • communicating caring and support;
  • setting high expectations;
  • providing meaningful opportunities for participation and involvement in the school community; and
  • viewing students from a strength-based perspective.

Viewing students' strengths and teaching appropriate behavior skills is an essential component of Positive Behavior Supports (PBS). To learn more about SERC’s PBS Initiative, click here.

Direct instruction in resiliency skills can be accomplished through comprehensive, universal social-emotional learning curricula. A recently published document, Safe and Sound, provides a listing of research-based programs. Written from a “consumer's perspective,” the publication provides a wealth of information about the components of each program and their efficacy. To download a copy of the document, click here: www.casel.org. For additional information about resiliency and the benefits of comprehensive programming, visit http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu.

Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement
Summary:

Report on the Imperative for Professional Development in Education

In this publication, released by the Albert Shanker Institute in conjunction with a professional development forum cosponsored with Achieve, Inc. (see below), Harvard professor Richard Elmore argues that education reforms that are based on standards and accountability will fail unless policymakers also adopt a strategy to ensure that educators have the knowledge and skill they need to help students succeed. The bottom line, says Elmore, is not in issues of governance and process, but in how the quality of instructional practice affects student learning.

Publication Date:2002
URL:

http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/Bridging_Gap.pdf

Content Type:
Professional Development
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Promising Practices in CT Schools
Summary:

Promising Practices in CT Schools

Publication Date:Current
URL:

http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

Content Type:
Promising Practices in Schools
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Building a New Structure For School Leadership
Summary:

Public schools and schools systems, as they are presently constituted, are simply not led in ways that enable them to respond to the increasing demands they face under standardsbased reform. Further, if schools, school systems, and their leaders respond to standards based reforms the way they have responded to other attempts at broad scale reform of public education over the past century, they will fail massively and visibly, with an attendant loss of public confidence and serious consequences for public education. The way out of this problem is through the large scale improvement of instruction, something public education has been unable to do to date, but which is possible with dramatic changes in the way public schools define and practice leadership.

Publication Date:2000
URL:

http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/building.pdf

Content Type:
Staff Development, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Equitable Access to opportunities and experiences ...

...that reflect and respect Race, culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, language, ability, and generational status.

 

Resource  

 Product Type

 Date

 

Annotated

 
 

Courageous Conversations About Race by Glenn Singleton and Curtis Linton

 Book

Courageous Conversations
 2005 This book provides a guide for educators to engage in conversations about race and its impact on the achievement of children of color.
 

Facilitator’s Guide: Courageous Conversations on Race

 Field Guide

Facilitator's Guide Courageous Conversations About Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools

 2007 

This field guide is a companion to the book Courageous Conversations about Race by Singleton and Linton.

 

We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know by Gary Howard

 Book

We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools (Multicultural Education (Paper))

 

2006

 

Gary Howard addresses the crucial relationship between educator and student and provides suggestions for personal reflection.

 

National Council for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)

 

Website:

 http://www.nccrest.org/

 11/5/07 

Resources for social justice materials and culturally responsive pedagogy.

 

The Free Child Project (501(c)3 Nonprofit):Social Justice Webpage

 

Website:

http://www.freechild.org/SJforALL.htm

 11/5/07 

List and description of organizations with long-standing work in the area of Social Justice.

 

Bibliography of Resources at the SERC Library on High Standards and Expectations

The following resources are available at the SERC Library and have been selected for their value in helping schools achieve High Standards and Expectations in their daily practice.

 

Books

Available through the SERC Library

Gill, V. (2001). The eleven commandments of good teaching: Creating classrooms where teachers can teach and students can learn. 2nd Ed. CA: Corwin Press. (view in card catalog)

Scheidecker, D., & William, J. (1999). Bringing out the best in students: How legendary teachers motivate kids. CA: Corwin Press.
(view in card catalog)

Krovetz, M (1999). Fostering resiliency: Expecting all students to use their minds and hearts well. CA: Corwin Press.
(view in card catalog)

Lunenburg, F. (2000). High expectations.An action plan for implementing goals 2000. CA: Corwin Press. (view in card catalog)

This book offers a blueprint for helping schools and students achieve high standards. It provides school leaders with action strategies for beginning or revisiting their reform efforts. Discussion of specific strategies for school leaders is included. References are provided at the end of each chapter for additional readings.

Ladson – Billings, G. (1994). The dreamkeepers: Successful teachers of African American children. CA: Jossey-Bass. (view in card catalog)

In this book, Ladson-Billings illustrates the inspiring influence of a select group of teachers who keep the dreams alive for African American students. Her portraits, interwoven with personal reflections, challenge readers to envision intellectually rigorous and culturally relevant classrooms that have the power to improve the lives of not just African American students but all children.

Tools:

DVD & Facilitators guide

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (Writer/Producer) (2005). Breaking through barriers to achievement. Alexandria, VA: Author

This DVD and guide provide four programs to assist strengthening student achievement. Program 1, Understanding the Role of Resiliency explains the strong link between achievement and resiliency, Program 2, Building Resiliency in the Classroom, reveals the teaching strategies and classroom practices that boost achievement by fostering resiliency in students, and Program 3, Sustaining Resiliency in Students, explores the characteristics of resiliency in depth through the profiles of several resilient students. Two workshop formats with handouts and readings give you many options for presenting a compelling program to audiences throughout your school community. (view in card catalog)

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (Writer/Producer). (2006). Best practices in action: Using analogies to enhance background knowledge. Alexandria, VA: Author.

This 28 minute DVD is designed to be used in teacher inservices, meetings or workshops to demonstrate the use of analogies to build student background knowledge of academic subjects. This is a research-based instructional strategy. Teaching students to identity similarities and differences by creating analogies can help them apply this higher order thinking process as they study new information. A Texas Teacher of the Year demonstrates how she uses analogies in her diverse 3rd grade classroom as she introduces material in a social studies lesson. (view in card catalog)

SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
Summary:

Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
Summary:

Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Learning Community
Summary:

Schools that function successfully as professional learning communities are able to readily acclimate and respond to new policies and other changes. In a professional learning community, teachers and administrators (1) share a vision focused on student learning, (2) share leadership and decision making, and (3) work and learn together as they continually examine instructional practices — all of which are supported by strong personal and professional relationships, time for collaboration, and good communication.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_proflrncommfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Improving Reading and Writing Skills in Language Arts Courses and Across the Curriculum
Summary:The 1998 High Schools That Work Assessment contains good and bad news about the reading performance of the 23,900 career-bound students who participated in the assessment at experienced HSTW sites. Based on the findings, this research brief answers the following three questions. What progress are HSTW sites making in advancing students' reading achievement? What conditions are associated with higher reading achievement? How can schools get at least 85 percent of career-bound students to meet the HSTW reading goal?
URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/ResearchBrief-ReadingandWriting.pdf
Content Type:
Teacher Resources
Grade Level:High School
Reform Elements:Restructuring, Accountability
Subject Area:Reading, Writing
A Practical Guide to Talking With Your Community About No Child Left Behind and Schools in Need of Improvement
Summary:Parents and the public at large are not well informed about the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act and how it will affect their children and schools. While this may create uncertainty and confusion in your community, it also offers school leaders a chance to discuss the law with them and enlist their support in meeting its new challenges. No Child Left Behind is controversial, with vocal supporters and critics. The materials presented here are not intended to engage debate about the pros and cons of the law. They are designed to help school leaders communicate with parents and the public about the law and its effects in each community. These were written primarily for district superintendents and principals, since they are often the first to be called to comment on school issues. But these materials can be readily adapted for use by teacher leaders, PTA presidents, school board members, and others. This Guide also contains links to many other resources on the law and other education issues. You will most likely want to adapt these for your community, picking and choosing the issues that are most relevant and modifying them with some specifics from your district and state. Many of the materials are designed so that they can easily be converted into brochures or flyers. For more information on No Child Left Behind, visit the Learning First Alliance web site at www.learningfirst.org or the U. S. Department of Education web site at www.ed.gov, and consult the web site for your state department of education.
URL:http://www.learningfirst.org/publications/nclbguide/
Content Type:
Teacher Resources
Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Reform Elements:Parent Involvement, Restructuring
High Schools That Work: Findings from the 1996 and 1998 Assessments
Summary:This report shows that in a two-year period between 1996 and 1998, High Schools That Work sites significantly increased the percentages of students in their senior classes who met the HSTW achievement goals in mathematics, science and reading and the percentages of students in their senior classes who completed the HSTW-recommended program of study. The report was prepared by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) of Research Triangle Park, N.C., for the U.S. Department of Education, Planning and Evaluation Service. It contains many tables and appendices based on the data.
Publication Date:April 2001
URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/ResearchReports/RTI_study.pdf
Grade Level:High School
Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models
Work-Based Learning: Good News, Bad News and Hope
Summary:The 1996 High Schools That Work Assessment report contains positive and negative findings, as well as reason for optimism, about the performance of high school students who have after-school jobs. The assessment of reading, mathematics and science performance was given to 12th-graders completing four courses in a vocational concentration at the Southern Regional Education Board’s High Schools That Work sites. Seventy-one percent of the students who took the assessment had part-time jobs; 44 percent of assessed students were earning school credit for their work experiences.
URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/97brief7.asp
Grade Level:High School
Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models, Community Involvement 
3: Strong Leadership top

School leadership is focused on enhancing the skills, knowledge, and motivation of the people in the organization and creating a common culture of high expectations based on the use of skills and knowledge to improve the performance of all students.  Leadership fosters a collaborative atmosphere between the school and the community while establishing positive systems to improve leadership, teaching, and student performance.

A Practical Guide to Talking With Your Community About No Child Left Behind and Schools in Need of Improvement
Summary:Parents and the public at large are not well informed about the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act and how it will affect their children and schools. While this may create uncertainty and confusion in your community, it also offers school leaders a chance to discuss the law with them and enlist their support in meeting its new challenges. No Child Left Behind is controversial, with vocal supporters and critics. The materials presented here are not intended to engage debate about the pros and cons of the law. They are designed to help school leaders communicate with parents and the public about the law and its effects in each community. These were written primarily for district superintendents and principals, since they are often the first to be called to comment on school issues. But these materials can be readily adapted for use by teacher leaders, PTA presidents, school board members, and others. This Guide also contains links to many other resources on the law and other education issues. You will most likely want to adapt these for your community, picking and choosing the issues that are most relevant and modifying them with some specifics from your district and state. Many of the materials are designed so that they can easily be converted into brochures or flyers. For more information on No Child Left Behind, visit the Learning First Alliance web site at www.learningfirst.org or the U. S. Department of Education web site at www.ed.gov, and consult the web site for your state department of education.
URL:http://www.learningfirst.org/publications/nclbguide/
Content Type:
Teacher Resources
Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Reform Elements:Parent Involvement, Restructuring
Developing Quality Programs for Pupil Services: A Self-Evaluative Guide
Publication Date:

1999

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/QPPupilSrves.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, Pupil Services
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
The Future of School Leadership in Connecticut
Summary:

There is mounting evidence that Connecticut, as well as the nation, is facing a steady decline in the number of individuals interested in pursuing a career in educational administration. Such a decline could affect the future quality of Connecticut's school leadership and, ultimately, student achievement. In September 1999, the State Board of Education approved a set of general recommendations on this issue and proposed a state-level committee to develop more specific solutions.

Publication Date:2000
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/Leadership/school_leadership.pdf

Content Type:
Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Best Practices for School Counseling in Connecticut
Publication Date:

2001

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/BestPractices.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, School Counseling
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT's Model Special Education Policy and Procedures Manual
Publication Date:

2007

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/PolicyProceduresManual.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
Special Education, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Leadership resources available at the SERC Library

Books

Villani, S. (2002). Mentoring programs for new teachers: Models of induction and support. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

This book offers a number of ways in which schools can support and empower teachers by providing mentoring programs that help train and retain teachers.

 

Gabriel, J.G. (2005).  How to thrive as a teacher. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

The author explores the responsibilities and rewards of teacher leadership, offering practical, positive advice on: identifying leadership qualities and building a team; enhancing communication and earning respect; overcoming obstacles and implementing change; energizing colleagues and strengthening morale; and improving student and teacher acheivement.

 

 

Video

Covey, S. R. (Writer/Director). (n.d.) Beyond principle-centered leadership: Empowerment. Washington, DC: Quality Learning Services.

This video is based on the author’s book First Things First and reports on standard practices of highly effective people and how they stay empowered within their organizations.

Self Inventory Adapted to Provide Staff Member Feedback
Summary:

This Inventory is designed to provide a profile of educational leadership. It consists of 68 statements that describe performances contained within the CSDE Standards for School Leaders. The ELSI was originally designed to promote self-appraisal and reflection focused on the School Leader Standards and this version has been adapted for school leaders interested in collecting the perceptions of staff with regard to observable performances over the course of a year.

Publication Date:2006
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2653&q=320414

Content Type:
Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Promising Practices in CT Schools
Summary:

Promising Practices in CT Schools

Publication Date:Current
URL:

http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

Content Type:
Promising Practices in Schools
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Educational Leadership Self Inventory
Summary:

This Self Inventory is designed to provide a personal profile of educational leadership. It consists of 69 statements that describe performances contained within the CSDE Standards for School Leaders.

Publication Date:2001
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/Leadership/elsi.pdf

Content Type:
Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Defining Effective Leadership for Connecticut's Schools
Summary:

A monograph prepared for the Connecticut State Department of Education Division of Teaching and Learning Bureau of Research and Teacher Assessment.

Publication Date:2008
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/Leadership/effective_leadership.pdf

Content Type:
Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Connecticut Code of Professional Responsibility for School Administrators
Summary:Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies
Section 10-145d-400b

Preamble
Subsection (a)

This Code of Professional Responsibility for School Administrators reaffirms and codifies the principles and standards that have guided the school administrator profession over the years. The principles set forth in this code are intended to guide the conduct and assist in the appraisal of conduct for the members of the profession and the public they serve.

Publication Date:2008
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2613&q=321330

Content Type:
Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Building a New Structure For School Leadership
Summary:

Public schools and schools systems, as they are presently constituted, are simply not led in ways that enable them to respond to the increasing demands they face under standardsbased reform. Further, if schools, school systems, and their leaders respond to standards based reforms the way they have responded to other attempts at broad scale reform of public education over the past century, they will fail massively and visibly, with an attendant loss of public confidence and serious consequences for public education. The way out of this problem is through the large scale improvement of instruction, something public education has been unable to do to date, but which is possible with dramatic changes in the way public schools define and practice leadership.

Publication Date:2000
URL:

http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/building.pdf

Content Type:
Staff Development, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development
Summary:

This Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development is designed to use multiple sources of data systematically collected by teachers and administrators, through the process of teacher evaluation and professional development. The school leader, in turn, analyzes this information and uses it as the basis of his/her own evaluation and professional development.

Publication Date:2006
URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2653&q=320412

Content Type:
Staff Development, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Equitable Access to opportunities and experiences ...

...that reflect and respect Race, culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, language, ability, and generational status.

 

Resource  

 Product Type

 Date

 

Annotated

 
 

Courageous Conversations About Race by Glenn Singleton and Curtis Linton

 Book

Courageous Conversations
 2005 This book provides a guide for educators to engage in conversations about race and its impact on the achievement of children of color.
 

Facilitator’s Guide: Courageous Conversations on Race

 Field Guide

Facilitator's Guide Courageous Conversations About Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools

 2007 

This field guide is a companion to the book Courageous Conversations about Race by Singleton and Linton.

 

We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know by Gary Howard

 Book

We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools (Multicultural Education (Paper))

 

2006

 

Gary Howard addresses the crucial relationship between educator and student and provides suggestions for personal reflection.

 

National Council for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)

 

Website:

 http://www.nccrest.org/

 11/5/07 

Resources for social justice materials and culturally responsive pedagogy.

 

The Free Child Project (501(c)3 Nonprofit):Social Justice Webpage

 

Website:

http://www.freechild.org/SJforALL.htm

 11/5/07 

List and description of organizations with long-standing work in the area of Social Justice.

 

SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
Summary:

Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
Summary:

Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Learning Community
Summary:

Schools that function successfully as professional learning communities are able to readily acclimate and respond to new policies and other changes. In a professional learning community, teachers and administrators (1) share a vision focused on student learning, (2) share leadership and decision making, and (3) work and learn together as they continually examine instructional practices — all of which are supported by strong personal and professional relationships, time for collaboration, and good communication.

Publication Date:2006
URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_proflrncommfolio.pdf
Content Type:
Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Lead and Manage My School - NCLB Requirements
Summary:This site provides educational leaders and communities access to the US Department of Education website with links to NCLB requirements.
URL:http://www.ed.gov/admins/lead/account/saa.html#ayp
Content Type:
Teacher Resources
Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Reform Elements:Restructuring, Strong Leadership
Making Leadership Happen
Summary:“We can develop leaders, and we know how to do it.” Unfortunately, most people don’t seem to agree that leadership is developed. Our nation’s business leaders do, but many of the persons who make decisions about the future of our states and our education systems don’t seem to agree, judged by the actions they take. “Leadership is not something that happens at conception, but it is developed and can be taught. Today we know more about how to prepare persons to lead organizations, including schools, than ever before.” So said Alton Crews, a veteran educator with more than 30 years’ experience as a superintendent and director of the SREB Leadership Academy.
URL:http://www.sreb.org/main/Leadership/pubs/TableOfContents.asp
Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Reform Elements:Strong Leadership
4: Supportive, Personalized, and Relevant Learning top

In high-performing schools, supportive learning environments provide positive personalized relationships for all students while engaging them in rigorous and relevant learning.

A Guide to Common Core State Standards-Based IEPs

This multimedia presentation is designed to provide a tool and a process for helping Connecticut educators develop standards-based IEPs.

word bank screen shot

It is presented in three parts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you're having difficulty viewing the presentations, you'll need the most recent version of Adobe's Flash Player installed in your browser, and a broadband Internet connection.

Directions for the Tutorials


This presentation provides instruction on a tool that promotes the design of standards-based IEP goals and objectives.  This presentation can be used for individual, small group, or full staff professional development.  The training is broken up into three separate parts that are sectioned into components intended to be used sequentially.  Each module contains hands-on opportunities to apply the skills taught in the presentation.  The three parts can be viewed in either a single sitting or over several sittings.  If you choose to view them in a single sitting, the total recommended time for viewing the presentations and the completion of the hands-on activities is 3 hours.  If you choose to view them in more than one sitting, it is recommended that you plan to complete at least one part in its entirety within a sitting.  It is also recommended that each sitting occurs reasonably close in time to maintain the flow and continuity of the learning.  E.g., Part 1 is viewed on Monday; parts 2 and 3 are viewed on Tuesday.  Listed below are the recommended times for each part.


Part 1:  1 ½ hours

Part 2: ½ hour

Part 3: 1 hour

Before Using This Tutorial:

  • Select a specific student to use as a case study
  • Obtain a copy of the district curriculum or Common Core State Standards frameworks in any subject area, matching the grade level of the selected student; Click here for a copy of the Connecticut Frameworks.
  • Obtain a copy of the student’s IEP
  • Download the tool here

Tips for Selecting a Case Study:

  • Determine if a single student case study should be used across all groups or if multiple cases should be used
  • Select cases that relate to the grade levels of the participants
  • Select cases that represent the typical scenarios in your district (i.e., use a “Goldilocks” rule: not too easy, not too hard)
  • Consider using students who have attended the school or district in which the participants are employed
  • Consider having participants volunteer to select their own cases
  • Remember to respect confidentiality and the integrity of the IEP process; change names of students ahead of time and inform participants that all programming changes for any student must be done through the IEP process outside of this training

 

Suggestions for Group Use:

  • Planning Ahead
    • Select facilitators for the session relative to the size of the total audience
    • Preview the tutorials ahead of time to assist in the organization and planning
    • Plan sufficient time for viewing, completing the activities, and discussing learning
    • If viewing over multiple sessions, plan each sitting close in time, e.g. over three consecutive days
    • Provide participant learning objectives or a purpose for the training, along with a brief description of Word Bank and how the training will be organized prior to the session
    • Copy all materials needed ahead of time
    • Determine if CEUs will be offered through your district
  • Organizing Participants and Space
    • Consider the size of the group carefully, relative to space available and number of facilitators; this training has been done for up to 50 participants at a time
    • Organize participants in teams of 2 to 5 prior to the session and have each team work together
    • Use a comfortable space and seating for adults with sufficient room for the facilitators to be able to roam
  • Organizing the Viewing
    • Viewing Using a Computer Lab
      • Pre-load or set up each computer with the tutorials prior to the session
      • Determine how the session will be paced across the groups
      • Use only pairs or trios for participant groupings
      • Provide directions and timing to the whole group and then allow groups to work at their own pace
      • Facilitators should roam to assist the groups
    • Viewing Whole Group
      • Have an LCD projector and a screen to project the modules to allow for simultaneous viewing
      • Have an adequate sound system to allow for everyone to hear comfortably
      • Group participants in small teams of 3 to 5
      • Arrange the room with multiple tables with 3 to 5 chairs around each table
      • Have one main facilitator lead the directions and pacing
      • Have other facilitators roam to assist the groups
    • Alternative Ways to View
      • Study Groups
        • Pre-set groups of 3 to 5 participants to work together
        • Provide either a set timeframe for completion within which participants can schedule viewing times on their own or establish scheduled blocks of time that participants can use to view
        • Determine locations and arrangement for viewing; locations can be spread out
      • Multiple Small Groups in Different Locations at the Same Time
        • Assign a facilitator to lead each group
        • Provide the facilitators with directions and a preview prior to the session
        • Provide a set location, materials, and viewing arrangements for each small group
        • Provide a set starting and ending time
        • Have one or more facilitators roam across the multiple groups and locations during the scheduled sessions
Introduction to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

This interactive learning module, prepared by SERC consultant Smita Worah, Ph.D., discusses communication and the basics of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).



screenshot

Click here to view this presentation

Supplementary Educational Services/ Servicios Educativos Suplementarios

Supplementary Educational Services

 

Servicios Educativos Suplementarios

 

 

H1N1 Resources for Schools
2009 Guidelines for the Identification of Children with Learning Disabilities
Watch these videos for an overview of Connecticut's revised 2009 LD Guidelines.
Connecticut's Framework for SRBI - Commissioner Mark McQuillan (video)

Mark McQuillan, Commissioner of Education, discusses Connecticut's Framework for SRBI.

 

Connecticut's Framework for SRBI from CT SERC on Vimeo.

Problems viewing the video? Try updating your Flash player at http://adobe.com. (Click the "Get Adobe Flash Player" link)

Building Capacity for the Implementation of SRBI

Throughout 2008-2009, the State Department of Education, in collaboration with SERC, has presented a series of forums focusing on building the capacity of districts to implement Scientific Research-Based Interventions (SRBI) that are aligned with Connecticut’s Framework for RtI. Forums have included an address by both a national expert who delved into one specific aspect of implementing SRBI and CT educators who described the practicalities of implementation in their school/district.

Presentation Title:

George M. Batsche, Ph.D., University of South Florida
Building Capacity for the Implementation of SRBI

View accompanying PowerPoint presentation while you watch the video.

Determining Eligibility for Special Education Speech and Language Services under IDEA
A tutorial designed to ensure that CT school Speech-Language Pathologists are practicing in accordance with the re-authorization of IDEA 2004.
The Role of Special Education in an RtI Model

Throughout 2008-2009, the State Department of Education, in collaboration with SERC, has presented a series of forums focusing on building the capacity of districts to implement Scientific Research-Based Interventions (SRBI) that are aligned with Connecticut’s Framework for RtI. Forums have included an address by both a national expert who delved into one specific aspect of implementing SRBI and CT educators who described the practicalities of implementation in their school/district.

Presentation Title:

Michael Coyne, Ph.D., University of Connecticut
The Role of Special Education in an RtI Model

View accompanying PowerPoint presentation while you watch the video.

Why RtI? Enhancing Outcomes for All Students

Throughout 2008-2009, the State Department of Education, in collaboration with SERC, has presented a series of forums focusing on building the capacity of districts to implement Scientific Research-Based Interventions (SRBI) that are aligned with Connecticut’s Framework for RtI. Forums have included an address by both a national expert who delved into one specific aspect of implementing SRBI and CT educators who described the practicalities of implementation in their school/district.

Presentation Title:

Jack Fletcher, Ph.D., University of Houston
Why SRBI? Enhancing Outcomes for All Students

View accompanying PowerPoint presentation while you watch the video.

Problem Solving and RtI: It All Begins in Tier I

Throughout 2008-2009, the State Department of Education, in collaboration with SERC, has presented a series of forums focusing on building the capacity of districts to implement Scientific Research-Based Interventions (SRBI) that are aligned with Connecticut’s Framework for RtI. Forums have included an address by both a national expert who delved into one specific aspect of implementing SRBI and CT educators who described the practicalities of implementation in their school/district.

Presentation Title:

Matthew K. Burns, Ph.D., University of Minnesota
Problem Solving and RtI: It All Begins in Tier I

View accompanying PowerPoint presentation while you watch the video.

Terms Related to English Language Learners

Terms Related to English Language Learners and their Common Uses (SERC, Nov. 2008)

Q & A with Jo Gusman

Jo Gusman, the founder of New Horizons in Education, Inc., is a former teacher and nationally-known presenter who specializes in the area of English language learners. She offered a workshop through SERC on October 29, 2008.

SRBI: Monitoring Student Progress and Fidelity of Implementation

Throughout 2008-2009, the State Department of Education, in collaboration with SERC, has presented a series of forums focusing on building the capacity of districts to implement Scientific Research-Based Interventions (SRBI) that are aligned with Connecticut’s Framework for RtI.  Forums have included an address by both a national expert who delved into one specific aspect of implementing SRBI and CT educators who described the practicalities of implementation in their school/district.

Presentation Title:

Craig A. Albers, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison
Monitoring Student Progress and Fidelity of Implementation

 

View accompanying PowerPoint presentation while you watch the video.

English Language Learners in CT

Connecticut Blooms with Cultural and Linguistic Richness

Students in Connecticut schools speak a diverse array of languages, from Akan and Algonquian to Zande and Zurate. During the 2007-2008 school year, a total of 161 dominant languages were spoken by Connecticut’s public school students in grades K-12. One in seven students had a dominant language other than English (72,417 students in Connecticut’s schools). Of those students, 41.3% were assessed as English Language Learners (28,879 students). For detailed information regarding dominant languages in Connecticut public schools, English Language Learners in Connecticut, identification and services, and the performance of English Language Learners and former English Language Learners, please read the Connecticut Department of Education’s July 2008 Data Bulletin on English Language Learners in CT. [Document available below.]

Of particular note in the CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs in CT (July 2008) are the performance levels of former English Language Learners as compared to the native English-speaking (non-ELL) students in the same grades. The data indicate that in the 2007-2008 school year, former ELLs (i.e., those students who have exited from ELL status by achieving linguistic proficiency on the designated state testthe LAS Linksand academic proficiency by achieving all grade-level performance standards on all subtests of the CMT) performed “as well or even better than non-ELL students, particularly on the writing section” of the CMT (CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs, July 2008, page 7).

 

Connecticut State Department of Education
Division of Assessment and Accountability
Bureau of Data Collection, Research and Evaluation
DATA BULLETIN - July 2008

Connecticut's Framework for RTI: A Family Guide

Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students


Teachers, administrators, and families want all children to succeed.  There are many ways to get children who are struggling to learn the additional help they need to be successful.  One way is with the use of “scientific research-based interventions” (SRBI).

This booklet reviews what SRBI are and includes questions you might want to ask your child’s school or program to learn more about how they are using SRBI as a framework to improve teaching and learning.  Also included here are ways families can be a part of the decision-making process and what to do when you have concerns about your child’s progress.

Download the Family Guide to RTI (pdf, 494kb)

Students with Disabilities and Parental Choice in Connecticut
Publication Date:

 2003

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/ParentalChoice.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
Disabilities, Parental Choice,  Families, Special Education
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Developing Quality Programs for Pupil Services: A Self-Evaluative Guide
Publication Date:

1999

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/QPPupilSrves.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, Pupil Services
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
Best Practices for School Counseling in Connecticut
Publication Date:

2001

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/BestPractices.pdf

 

  
Content Type:
ISSS, School Counseling
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT's Procedural Safeguards in Special Education
Publication Date:

2006

URL:

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Prosaf.pdf (PDF)

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/Prosaf_fullversion.pdf (Full Version)

http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/ProsafSpan.pdf (Spanish)

  
Content Type:
Special Education, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT Guide for the Training, Use and Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Aides and Assistants in Connecticut
Publication Date:

1999

URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guide4TrngUse.pdf
  
Content Type:
Speech and Language, Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT Guidelines for Training and Support of Paraprofessionals
Publication Date:

2008

URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Paraprofessionals.pdf
  
Content Type:
Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
  
  
CT Guidelines for Speech and Language Programs
Publication Date:

2008

URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Speech_Language_2008.pdf
  
  • Speech-Language Eligibility Forms in PDF fill-in format (2008) 
    Early Intervening Services · Evaluation · Fluency · Language · Phonology · PPT Report · Reevaluation · Voice  
  • Supplemental Resource Packet for the Guidelines for Speech and Language Programs (2008) [ZIP]
  • Content Type:
    Speech and Language, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Physical Therapy in Educational Settings
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/PTGuidelines.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Physical Therapy, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Educational Settings
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/OTGuidelines.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Occupational Therapy, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Learning Disabilities
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/LDGuide.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    LD, Learning Disabilities, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Intellectual Disability
    Publication Date:

    2007

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/guide_intellectualdisability2007.pdf
      ID Eligibility Documentation Worksheet [PDF] 43KB [Word
    Content Type:
    Intellectual Disability, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Intellectual Disability - Executive Summary
    Publication Date:

    2006

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/ID_Guidelines_Exec.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Intellectual Disability, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying and Educating Students with Serious Emotional Disturbance
    Publication Date:

    1997

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/SEDguide.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Emotional Disturbance, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Response to Intervention: Connecticut Directions

    Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students
    Connecticut's framework for RtI

    Background

    Federal laws have issued clear expectations for schools regarding their obligations to educate diverse groups of students well.  This legislation includes the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA).  NCLB aims to ensure the academic growth and achievement of all students regardless of their race, ethnicity, fluency in English, disability, or socioeconomic status.  IDEA 2004 continues the federal mandate, in effect since 1975, for schools to provide all children with disabilities a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), and also contains some important revisions with clear implications for general as well as special education.  These revisions encourage the implementation of research-based interventions that facilitate success in the general education setting for a broad range of students.  In particular, school districts are allowed to use a process known as Response to Intervention (RTI)as part of identification procedures for learning disabilities, by far the largest category under which K-12 students in special education are served, roughly half of all special education students nationwide (see www.ideadata.org)

    RTI models grew out of research suggesting that traditional approaches to identifying learning disabilities are seriously flawed and that students sometimes end up in the special education system not due to genuine disabilities, but other factors, such as inadequate general education practices and limited opportunities for extra help for struggling students (e.g., Fletcher et al., 1994; Lyon, 1996; Spear-Swerling and Sternberg, 1996), including those students acquiring English.  RTI involves providing scientific, research-based instruction and intervention matched to student needs, with important educational decisions based on students’ levels of performance and learning rates over time.  Rather than limiting the provision of instructional and social/behavioral supports for those students classified under a particular label or program, supports are provided to all students, based on individual needs.

    The basic principles underlying RTI hold considerable promise for helping Connecticut schools to improve education for all students and address the large disparities in performance within the state.  These basic principles have been embraced by the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) for a number of years, as well as supported by state legislation and policy.  Furthermore, numerous ongoing projects and initiatives in Connecticut, such as those involving collaborations among researchers, teacher educators and public schools, provide a strong foundation for the implementation of RTI.

     

     

    Typical Speech and Language Development for School-Age Children

    A Checklist for School Nurses

    Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D., CCC

    School nurses, particularly those in elementary schools, may have the broadest perspective of the students in their building, as they can observe children grow and communicate in various settings over multiple years. Their experience with typical development is a valuable reference point for appraising speech and language skills in children with disabilities as well as those presenting indications of being at risk. As school nurses have frequent contact with teachers, other student support services professionals, and families, they can be instrumental in sharing information about speech and language concerns. Their perspective and input can be influential in preventing speech and language problems, intervening early, or facilitating referral for a speech and language evaluation if needed.

    During hearing, vision, and scoliosis screenings, school nurses have occasions, albeit brief, to engage in conversation. Sick visits to the nurse often result in more extended interactions. Although these situations may not reliably reflect a child’s day-to-day speech and language skills, they can yield useful information. Explaining physical symptoms or describing a playground accident are demanding communicative contexts for children, as they must be able to convey both the past and the present, what they have experienced, and what they are currently feeling, through words, gestures, or facial expressions.

    A checklist of typical speech and language milestones for school-age children in preschool through grade 6 has been developed especially for school nurses as part of SERC’s professional development training, The Nursing Component of the IEP.

    Click here for a printable version of Typical Speech and Language Development for School-Age Children: A Checklist for School Nurses (Portable Document Format (.pdf), 138kb)

    A note of caution for school nurses using the checklist …

    • keep in mind that there are no clear dividing lines between the stages of speech and language development, and
    • child’s speech and language skills must be viewed relative to the cultural norms of the community.
    Supporting Student Success By Building Resiliency Skills

    Ruth D. Kirsch, Ph.D., LCSW

    Children arrive at school with different “standard equipment”: abilities, skills, needs, and readiness to learn. For example, some students have few opportunities to develop the early skills that support reading success. An accompanying ISSS Brief, Vocabulary Instruction Through Stories and Expansion, explores some innovative approaches to help develop those skills. But student success is not limited to reading and math. In order to be successful in life, children must also develop healthy personal skills, both interpersonal (“plays well with others”) and intrapersonal -- those skills that are necessary to deal with adversity and promote emotional health. This Brief addresses the latter category: students’ ability to respond to life stressors, generally labeled coping or resiliency skills.

    These skills start to develop early in life as an interaction of the infant’s temperament and the responsiveness of his or her environment, most especially the development of a secure, trusting attachment to a caregiver. Resiliency skills continue to develop and to be refined throughout one’s lifetime; they can be learned at any age. Often, resiliency is thought of as a “protective factor” since it tends to counteract, or mitigate against, “risk factors” such as biological compromises, development delays, emotional difficulties, poverty, and family circumstances. Resiliency is defined as the ability to maintain personal competency despite encountering adverse situations, misfortune, or stressful events. From a child’s perspective, resiliency might be described as:

    • I have
      • Trusting relationships with adults and friends
      • Rules and structure to my life
      • Parental (teacher) encouragement
    • I am
      • Loveable
      • Capable
    • I can
      • Do things well (academics, sports, computers, etc.)
      • Act independently
      • Make meaningful choices

    Essential resiliency skills also serve to protect against a variety of adverse life outcomes: acting-out behavior (eg., bullying), substance abuse, sexual promiscuity and accompanying sexually transmitted diseases, depression, and suicide. To accomplish prevention, research recommends developing skills in self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making (Greenberg et al., 2001). Furthermore, research suggests that prevention is best accomplished through comprehensive programs designed to teach all of the skills, rather a program targeting one adverse outcome such as substance abuse.

    Schools are an excellent place to foster healthy development in youngsters whether teaching the “Three Rs” or AP chemistry. Each adult can support resiliency development by

    • communicating caring and support;
    • setting high expectations;
    • providing meaningful opportunities for participation and involvement in the school community; and
    • viewing students from a strength-based perspective.

    Viewing students' strengths and teaching appropriate behavior skills is an essential component of Positive Behavior Supports (PBS). To learn more about SERC’s PBS Initiative, click here.

    Direct instruction in resiliency skills can be accomplished through comprehensive, universal social-emotional learning curricula. A recently published document, Safe and Sound, provides a listing of research-based programs. Written from a “consumer's perspective,” the publication provides a wealth of information about the components of each program and their efficacy. To download a copy of the document, click here: www.casel.org. For additional information about resiliency and the benefits of comprehensive programming, visit http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu.

    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Equitable Access to opportunities and experiences ...

    ...that reflect and respect Race, culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, language, ability, and generational status.

     

    Resource  

     Product Type

     Date

     

    Annotated

     
     

    Courageous Conversations About Race by Glenn Singleton and Curtis Linton

     Book

    Courageous Conversations
     2005 This book provides a guide for educators to engage in conversations about race and its impact on the achievement of children of color.
     

    Facilitator’s Guide: Courageous Conversations on Race

     Field Guide

    Facilitator's Guide Courageous Conversations About Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools

     2007 

    This field guide is a companion to the book Courageous Conversations about Race by Singleton and Linton.

     

    We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know by Gary Howard

     Book

    We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools (Multicultural Education (Paper))

     

    2006

     

    Gary Howard addresses the crucial relationship between educator and student and provides suggestions for personal reflection.

     

    National Council for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)

     

    Website:

     http://www.nccrest.org/

     11/5/07 

    Resources for social justice materials and culturally responsive pedagogy.

     

    The Free Child Project (501(c)3 Nonprofit):Social Justice Webpage

     

    Website:

    http://www.freechild.org/SJforALL.htm

     11/5/07 

    List and description of organizations with long-standing work in the area of Social Justice.

     

    Autism Web Resources

    Autism Society of America
    www.autism-society.org

    This site provides general information on autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including diagnostic information, treatment options, and dealing with challenging behaviors. News, that includes current research, events, and conferences, is available. Access to local chapters of the Autism Society is provided also.

    The CT Autism Spectrum Resource Center
    www.ct-asrc.org

    Recent information pertaining to research, legislative updates, and resources on autism spectrum disorders is available on this site. This site also contains conference and advocacy information.

    Connecticut Families for Effective Autism Treatment (CT FEAT)
    www.ctfeat.org

    Visit this site for information on diagnosis and treatment interventions of autism spectrum disorders. Families are provided with networking opportunities and resource information through recommended readings, discussions of legal issues, conference updates, parent support meetings, and advocacy.

    The Yale Child Study Center
    Developmental Disabilities Clinic and Research
    www.autism.fm

    This site contains clinical information on autism spectrum disorders associated with the work of Ami Klin, Ph.D., and Fred Volkmar, Ph.D. Information on current research studies, PDD resources, and conference updates may be found.

    CT Guidelines for In-School and Out-of-School Suspensions
    Summary:

    This guidance document has been written to assist school districts in implementing Section 10-233c of the Connecticut General Statutes. The law will go into effect on July 1, 2009, however it requires that I issue guidelines by October 1, 2008, to aid districts in making the determination about whether suspensions should be in-school or out-of-school. By providing this information now, school boards and building administrators will have time to prepare for and adjust to the changes required by the law and to reassess the effectiveness of their current suspension policies.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/pressroom/In_School_Suspension_Guidance.pdf
    Content Type:
    Suspension, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Literacy Blocks Resources
    Summary:

    Articles

    • Fisher, D. (2001). “We’re moving on up”: creating a schoolwide literacy effort in an urban high school. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 45 (2), 92-101.
    • Geiken, N., Larson, J., Van Deusen, J. (1999). Block scheduling: Opportunities and challenges for collaboration. Teacher Librarian, 27 (1), 26-31.
     Books
    • Robbins, P., Gregory, G., & Herndon, L. E. (2000). Thinking inside the block schedule: Strategies for teaching in extended periods of time. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
    • Canady, R. L., Rettig, M. D. (1995). Block scheduling: A catalyst for change in high school. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Marshak, D. (1997). Action research on block scheduling. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Morrow, L. M. (2003). Organizing & managing the language arts block: A professional development guide. New York, NY: The Guildford Press.
    • Cunningham, P. & Allington, R. (2003). Classrooms that work: They can all read and write. Lebanon, IN: Pearson Education.
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
     
     
      
      
      
    Early Childhood Care and Education: Effects on Ethnic and Racial Gaps in School Readiness
    Summary:

    The authors examine black, white, and Hispanic children's differing experiences in early childhood care and education and explore links between these experiences and racial and ethnic gaps in school readiness.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.futureofchildren.org/information2826/information_show.htm?doc_id=255993
    Content Type:
    Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment
    Content:School Readiness, Achievement Gap, Early Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
     
    Adolescent Literacy and Older Students with Learning Disabilities
    Summary:

    This NJCLD paper addresses critical issues related to the literacy needs of adolescents with LD and advocates for effective reading and writing instruction for these students. To improve adolescent literacy, key areas requiring attention include, but are not limited to, the following:

    1. Research initiatives and implementation of best practices
      1. Assessment;
      2. Use of RTI and other alternative approaches for the purposes of identification, instructional planning, and progress monitoring;
      3. Instructional approaches;
      4. Use of universal design to meet print and digital literacy demands;
      5. Learner profiles.
    2. Professional development planning and practices
      1. Current science and research-informed practices;
      2. Differentiation based on professional roles and responsibilities.
    3. Educational priorities, policies, and practices
      1. Organizational restructuring;
      2. Continuum of services;
      3. Shared responsibility for literacy instruction.
    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/25031
    Content Type:
    Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment
    Student Audience:Special Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
    Subject Area:Language Arts, Writing
    National Implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI): Research Summary
    Summary:The current national trend in today’s schools is to meet the needs of struggling and at-risk learners through the implementation of multi-tiered response to intervention models. This research sought to better understand the national perspective of RTI by investigating the level of emphasis of current and projected state-wide efforts for implementing RTI from the perspectives of special education state department directors in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. An 86% response rate was obtained and every state indicated some emphasis on RTI either in current practice or in development. Statewide training efforts are underway in 90% of the states primarily emphasizing an overview of RTI, progress monitoring and the use of data-driven decision-making. The areas receiving less training emphasis include culturally responsive RTI and roles of educators in implementing response to intervention. Over one-third of the states indicated that they plan to use RTI, in part, as a replacement or supplement to the learning disability discrepancy model. In addition, most states indicated that they are or plan to use a combined problem solving- standard treatment protocol model for making multi-tiered RTI decisions. Suggestions for additional research are also provided. Data were gathered during the spring and summer, 2007.
    URL:http://www.nasdse.org/Portals/0/NationalImplementationofRTI-ResearchSummary.pdf
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
    Reform Elements:RTI, Restructuring
    Is Hyperactive Behavior the Real Problem?
    Is Hyperactive Behavior the Real Problem?

    Ruth D. Kirsch, Ph.D., LCSW

    In any space where teachers congregate, a frequent topic of discussion is the distracting behavior of students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Typically the statement "If he would only sit still!" elicits compassion and war stories about similar students. No one challenges the statement, or even inquires about what might happen if Johnny did sit still. What would happen?

    5: Parent/Community Involvement top

    In high-performing schools, parents and community members help develop, understand, and support a clear and common focus on core academic, social, and personal goals contributing to improved student performance and have a meaningful and authentic role in achieving these goals.  The school community works together to actively solve problems and create win-win solutions.  Mentoring and outreach programs provide for two-way learning between students and community/business members. 

    Connecticut's Framework for RTI: A Family Guide

    Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students


    Teachers, administrators, and families want all children to succeed.  There are many ways to get children who are struggling to learn the additional help they need to be successful.  One way is with the use of “scientific research-based interventions” (SRBI).

    This booklet reviews what SRBI are and includes questions you might want to ask your child’s school or program to learn more about how they are using SRBI as a framework to improve teaching and learning.  Also included here are ways families can be a part of the decision-making process and what to do when you have concerns about your child’s progress.

    Download the Family Guide to RTI (pdf, 494kb)

    Student Guide to Understanding Your Rights and Responsibilities under IDEA
    Publication Date:

     2003

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/StudentGuideIdea03.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/StudentGuideIDEA03Span.pdf (Spanish)

      
    Content Type:
    Disabilities, IDEA,  Families, Special Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Students with Disabilities and Parental Choice in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

     2003

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/ParentalChoice.pdf

     

      
    Content Type:
    Disabilities, Parental Choice,  Families, Special Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    PPT Checklist

     

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Before_PPT.pdf

     

      
    Content Type:
    PPT, Checklist, Families, Special Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Parent's Guide to Special Education in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

    2007

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Parents_Guide_SE.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/Parents_Guide_SE_Span.pdf (Spanish)

      
    Content Type:
    Resource Directory, Families, Special Education
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Helpful CT Resources for Families
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Resources_Families.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/Resources_Families_Span.pdf (Spanish)

      
    Content Type:
    Resource Directory, Families
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Resource Directory of Specialists: Educating Students with an Intellectual Disability in the General Education Environment
    Publication Date:

    2005

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/ResourceDir_Qualified_Specialists.pdf

      
    Content Type:
    Resource Directory, Intellectual Disability
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Resource Directory of Educational Programs and Practices
    Publication Date:

    2001

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/resource.pdf

      
    Content Type:
    Resource Directory, Educational Programs
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT's Procedural Safeguards in Special Education
    Publication Date:

    2006

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Prosaf.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/Prosaf_fullversion.pdf (Full Version)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/ProsafSpan.pdf (Spanish)

      
    Content Type:
    Special Education, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Equitable Access to opportunities and experiences ...

    ...that reflect and respect Race, culture, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, language, ability, and generational status.

     

    Resource  

     Product Type

     Date

     

    Annotated

     
     

    Courageous Conversations About Race by Glenn Singleton and Curtis Linton

     Book

    Courageous Conversations
     2005 This book provides a guide for educators to engage in conversations about race and its impact on the achievement of children of color.
     

    Facilitator’s Guide: Courageous Conversations on Race

     Field Guide

    Facilitator's Guide Courageous Conversations About Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools

     2007 

    This field guide is a companion to the book Courageous Conversations about Race by Singleton and Linton.

     

    We Can’t Teach What We Don’t Know by Gary Howard

     Book

    We Can't Teach What We Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools (Multicultural Education (Paper))

     

    2006

     

    Gary Howard addresses the crucial relationship between educator and student and provides suggestions for personal reflection.

     

    National Council for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)

     

    Website:

     http://www.nccrest.org/

     11/5/07 

    Resources for social justice materials and culturally responsive pedagogy.

     

    The Free Child Project (501(c)3 Nonprofit):Social Justice Webpage

     

    Website:

    http://www.freechild.org/SJforALL.htm

     11/5/07 

    List and description of organizations with long-standing work in the area of Social Justice.

     

    Autism Web Resources

    Autism Society of America
    www.autism-society.org

    This site provides general information on autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including diagnostic information, treatment options, and dealing with challenging behaviors. News, that includes current research, events, and conferences, is available. Access to local chapters of the Autism Society is provided also.

    The CT Autism Spectrum Resource Center
    www.ct-asrc.org

    Recent information pertaining to research, legislative updates, and resources on autism spectrum disorders is available on this site. This site also contains conference and advocacy information.

    Connecticut Families for Effective Autism Treatment (CT FEAT)
    www.ctfeat.org

    Visit this site for information on diagnosis and treatment interventions of autism spectrum disorders. Families are provided with networking opportunities and resource information through recommended readings, discussions of legal issues, conference updates, parent support meetings, and advocacy.

    The Yale Child Study Center
    Developmental Disabilities Clinic and Research
    www.autism.fm

    This site contains clinical information on autism spectrum disorders associated with the work of Ami Klin, Ph.D., and Fred Volkmar, Ph.D. Information on current research studies, PDD resources, and conference updates may be found.

    Early Childhood Education Initiative: Publications and Related Websites

    Greater Expectations: Connecticut’s Comprehensive Plan for Education 2001-2005
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/whatsnew/greater_expectations.pdf
    This comprehensive plan addresses one part of the State Board of Education’s statutory requirement to provide leadership to school districts with respect to preschool, elementary and secondary education, special education, vocational education and adult education by developing a comprehensive plan every 5 years.

    Connecticut’s Blueprint for Reading Achievement
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/dtl/curriculum/currcbra.htm
    This is the report of the Early Reading Success Panel, published by the CT State Department of Education in 2000. It contains a general overview of basic research finding about reading and specifies the competencies required for reading success for children in kindergarten through grade 3.

    Early Literacy Development: A Focus on Preschool http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/literacy.pdf
    This CT State Department of Education concept paper examines what literacy is, how to promote literacy with preschoolers and how to assess literacy development.

    Connecticut’s Preschool Curriculum Framework and Benchmarks for Children in Preschool Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/Frmwrkbench.pdf
    This State Department of Education, Bureau of Early Childhood Education and Social Services document outlines content standards and performance indicators in the areas of personal and social development, physical development, cognitive development and creative expression/aesthetic development

    “Family Friendly” Services for Preschool Special Education
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/friendly.pdf
    The purpose of this guide is to provide guiding principles, recommended practices and tools which school district preschool special education personnel can use to provide “family friendly” services.

    Preschool Special Education Program
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/pssed.pdf
    This outline of the CT State Department of Education’s Bureau of Early Childhood Education and Social Services program for preschoolers with special needs describes its purpose, philosophy, eligibility and legislative authority.

    A Guide to Using the Position Statement on School-Family-Community Partnerships in Early Care and Education Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/readiness/alerts/TA-SR-00-01guide.pdf
    This document examines how to develop comprehensive school-family-community partnerships in preschool settings. It looks at six partnership standards and offers sample activities.

    Position Statement on School-Family-Community Partnerships
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/board/partnerships.pdf
    This CT State Board of Education Position Statement encourages schools to develop comprehensive school-family-community partnerships by developing programs related to six standards.

    CT State Board of Education – Position Statement on Preschool Services and Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/PreschoolPositionStatement.pdf
    This State Board of Education position statement outlines the qualities of preschool programs and activities which will maximize the development of preschoolers.

    Other Links of Interest:

    Accreditation Facilitation Project (AFP) http://www.ctcharts-a-course.org/accreditationf.htm

    Commission On Children http://www.cga.state.ct.us/coc

    CT Department of Public Health Child Day Care Licensing Program http://www.dph.state.ct.us/BRS/Day_Care/day_care.htm

    CT Voices for Children Website http://www.ctkidslink.org

    CT-Charts-A-Course http://www.ctcharts-a-course.org

    DSS Child Care Team http://www.dss.state.ct.us/ccare/ccare.htm

    Hartford Area Child Care Collaborative http://www.hartnet.org/haccc/

    Hartford Association for the Education of Young Children http://www.haeyc.org

    Dialogue on Early Childhood Science, Mathematics and Technology Education
    http://www.project2061.org/tools/earlychild

     

    •The Annie E. Casey Fondation
    http://www.aecf.org
    •GreatKids CT
    http://www.greatkidsCT.org
    •Children's Defense Fund
    http://www.childrensdefense.org
    •Infoline
    http://www.infoline.org
    •CT Birth to Three System
    http://www.birth23.org
    •National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
    http://www.naeyc.org
    •CT Parent Advocacy Center (CPAC)
    http://www.cpacinc.org
    •National Childcare Information Center
    http://www.nccic.org
    •CT State Department of Education
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde
    •National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System
    http://nectas.unc.edu
    •The Division for Early Childhood (DEC)
    http://www.dec-sped.org
    •National Head Start Association
    http://www.nhsa.org
    •ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education
    http://www.ericeece.org
    •Zero to Three
    http://www.zerotothree.org
    The Contribution of Parenting to Ethnic and Racial Gaps in School Readiness
    Summary:

    The authors describe various parenting behaviors, such as nurturance, discipline, teaching, and language use, and explain how researchers measure them. They note racial and ethnic variations in several behaviors. Most striking are differences in language use. Black and Hispanic mothers talk less with their young children than do white mothers and are less likely to read to them daily. They also note some differences in harshness.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.futureofchildren.org/information2826/information_show.htm?doc_id=255990
    Content Type:
    Parent Involvement, Achievement Gap
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
    Response to Intervention (RTI): A Primer for Parents
    Summary:

    A major concern for parents as well as teachers is how to help children who experience difficulty in school. All parents want to see their child excel, and it can be very frustrating when a child falls behind in either learning to read, achieving as expected in math and other subjects, or in getting along socially with peers and teachers. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-step approach to providing services and interventions to struggling learners at increasing levels of intensity. RTI allows for early intervention by providing academic and behavioral supports rather than waiting for a child to fail before offering help.

    Some new federal laws have directed schools to focus more on helping all children learn by addressing problems earlier, before the child is so far behind that a referral to special education services is warranted. These laws include the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004. Both laws underscore the importance of providing high quality, scientifically-based instruction and interventions, and hold schools accountable for the progress of all students in terms of meeting state grade level standards. RTI is a process designed to help schools focus on these high quality interventions while carefully monitoring student progress. The information gained from an RTI process is used by school personnel and parents to inform instruction and to determine the educational needs of the child.

    Publication Date:2007
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/15857
    Content Type:
    Parent Involvement, RTI
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
    Goal Setting for Children with Learning Disabilities: Your Role is Important
    Summary:Here are some ways to help your children, students, clients, and people with learning disabilities set their own goals and reach them.
    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/21026
    Content Type:
    Parent Involvement 
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
     
    Documenting Communication with the School About Special Services
    Summary:

    In this article, you will learn to create paper trails by documenting contacts with the school — conversations, meetings, and other events.

    You can use low-tech tools — logs, journals, and calendars. You saw how to use a contact log to document telephone conversations and meetings.

    You will think about the powerful decision-making Stranger when you write descriptions of events, concerns, and problems.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/24697
    Content Type:
    Parent Involvment
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
     
    A Practical Guide to Talking With Your Community About No Child Left Behind and Schools in Need of Improvement
    Summary:Parents and the public at large are not well informed about the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act and how it will affect their children and schools. While this may create uncertainty and confusion in your community, it also offers school leaders a chance to discuss the law with them and enlist their support in meeting its new challenges. No Child Left Behind is controversial, with vocal supporters and critics. The materials presented here are not intended to engage debate about the pros and cons of the law. They are designed to help school leaders communicate with parents and the public about the law and its effects in each community. These were written primarily for district superintendents and principals, since they are often the first to be called to comment on school issues. But these materials can be readily adapted for use by teacher leaders, PTA presidents, school board members, and others. This Guide also contains links to many other resources on the law and other education issues. You will most likely want to adapt these for your community, picking and choosing the issues that are most relevant and modifying them with some specifics from your district and state. Many of the materials are designed so that they can easily be converted into brochures or flyers. For more information on No Child Left Behind, visit the Learning First Alliance web site at www.learningfirst.org or the U. S. Department of Education web site at www.ed.gov, and consult the web site for your state department of education.
    URL:http://www.learningfirst.org/publications/nclbguide/
    Content Type:
    Teacher Resources
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
    Reform Elements:Parent Involvement, Restructuring
    Work-Based Learning: Good News, Bad News and Hope
    Summary:The 1996 High Schools That Work Assessment report contains positive and negative findings, as well as reason for optimism, about the performance of high school students who have after-school jobs. The assessment of reading, mathematics and science performance was given to 12th-graders completing four courses in a vocational concentration at the Southern Regional Education Board’s High Schools That Work sites. Seventy-one percent of the students who took the assessment had part-time jobs; 44 percent of assessed students were earning school credit for their work experiences.
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/97brief7.asp
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models, Community Involvement 
    6: Monitoring, Accountability, and Assessment top

    In high-performing schools, teaching and learning are continually adjusted on the basis of data collected through a variety of valid and reliable methods that indicate student progress and needs.  The assessment results are interpreted and applied appropriately to improve individual student performance and the instructional program.

    The Educational Benefit Review Process

    A Reflective Process to Examine the Quality of IEPs

    The purpose of the Educational Benefit Review Process is to provide a structured reflective process to assess the whether an IEP is reasonably calculated to provide educational benefit. This process assists educators and families in examining the characteristics of IEPs that increase student access to, participation in, and progress in general education by providing an appropriate education. The purpose of the Educational Benefit Review Process is to determine whether the design of the IEP was reasonably calculated for the student to receive educational benefit.

    This document provides a background into the development of the Educational Benefit Review Process, as well as an overview of the process itself and a bibliography of resources.

    Download the Educational Benefit Review Process document here

    It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. click here to download the PDF file.

    Download the Educational Benefit Review Process document here

    A Guide to Common Core State Standards-Based IEPs

    This multimedia presentation is designed to provide a tool and a process for helping Connecticut educators develop standards-based IEPs.

    word bank screen shot

    It is presented in three parts:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    If you're having difficulty viewing the presentations, you'll need the most recent version of Adobe's Flash Player installed in your browser, and a broadband Internet connection.

    Directions for the Tutorials


    This presentation provides instruction on a tool that promotes the design of standards-based IEP goals and objectives.  This presentation can be used for individual, small group, or full staff professional development.  The training is broken up into three separate parts that are sectioned into components intended to be used sequentially.  Each module contains hands-on opportunities to apply the skills taught in the presentation.  The three parts can be viewed in either a single sitting or over several sittings.  If you choose to view them in a single sitting, the total recommended time for viewing the presentations and the completion of the hands-on activities is 3 hours.  If you choose to view them in more than one sitting, it is recommended that you plan to complete at least one part in its entirety within a sitting.  It is also recommended that each sitting occurs reasonably close in time to maintain the flow and continuity of the learning.  E.g., Part 1 is viewed on Monday; parts 2 and 3 are viewed on Tuesday.  Listed below are the recommended times for each part.


    Part 1:  1 ½ hours

    Part 2: ½ hour

    Part 3: 1 hour

    Before Using This Tutorial:

    • Select a specific student to use as a case study
    • Obtain a copy of the district curriculum or Common Core State Standards frameworks in any subject area, matching the grade level of the selected student; Click here for a copy of the Connecticut Frameworks.
    • Obtain a copy of the student’s IEP
    • Download the tool here

    Tips for Selecting a Case Study:

    • Determine if a single student case study should be used across all groups or if multiple cases should be used
    • Select cases that relate to the grade levels of the participants
    • Select cases that represent the typical scenarios in your district (i.e., use a “Goldilocks” rule: not too easy, not too hard)
    • Consider using students who have attended the school or district in which the participants are employed
    • Consider having participants volunteer to select their own cases
    • Remember to respect confidentiality and the integrity of the IEP process; change names of students ahead of time and inform participants that all programming changes for any student must be done through the IEP process outside of this training

     

    Suggestions for Group Use:

    • Planning Ahead
      • Select facilitators for the session relative to the size of the total audience
      • Preview the tutorials ahead of time to assist in the organization and planning
      • Plan sufficient time for viewing, completing the activities, and discussing learning
      • If viewing over multiple sessions, plan each sitting close in time, e.g. over three consecutive days
      • Provide participant learning objectives or a purpose for the training, along with a brief description of Word Bank and how the training will be organized prior to the session
      • Copy all materials needed ahead of time
      • Determine if CEUs will be offered through your district
    • Organizing Participants and Space
      • Consider the size of the group carefully, relative to space available and number of facilitators; this training has been done for up to 50 participants at a time
      • Organize participants in teams of 2 to 5 prior to the session and have each team work together
      • Use a comfortable space and seating for adults with sufficient room for the facilitators to be able to roam
    • Organizing the Viewing
      • Viewing Using a Computer Lab
        • Pre-load or set up each computer with the tutorials prior to the session
        • Determine how the session will be paced across the groups
        • Use only pairs or trios for participant groupings
        • Provide directions and timing to the whole group and then allow groups to work at their own pace
        • Facilitators should roam to assist the groups
      • Viewing Whole Group
        • Have an LCD projector and a screen to project the modules to allow for simultaneous viewing
        • Have an adequate sound system to allow for everyone to hear comfortably
        • Group participants in small teams of 3 to 5
        • Arrange the room with multiple tables with 3 to 5 chairs around each table
        • Have one main facilitator lead the directions and pacing
        • Have other facilitators roam to assist the groups
      • Alternative Ways to View
        • Study Groups
          • Pre-set groups of 3 to 5 participants to work together
          • Provide either a set timeframe for completion within which participants can schedule viewing times on their own or establish scheduled blocks of time that participants can use to view
          • Determine locations and arrangement for viewing; locations can be spread out
        • Multiple Small Groups in Different Locations at the Same Time
          • Assign a facilitator to lead each group
          • Provide the facilitators with directions and a preview prior to the session
          • Provide a set location, materials, and viewing arrangements for each small group
          • Provide a set starting and ending time
          • Have one or more facilitators roam across the multiple groups and locations during the scheduled sessions
    Webinar: Evaluation Timelines Data Submission for Indicator 11

    Webinar regarding Evaluation Timelines Data Submission for Indicator 11 presented on June 12, 2009 by Dr. Jacqueline Kelleher, Consultant, CSDE.

    Evaluation Timelines Data Submission from CT SERC on Vimeo.

    Problems viewing the video? Try updating your Flash player at http://adobe.com. (Click the "Get Adobe Flash Player" link)

    CT Teacher Supervisory Checklist

     Published:

     2007
    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/curriculum/cali/teachsuper_2008.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Teachers, Assessment, Legislation
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Assessment Checklist for Paraprofessionals

     Published:

     2007
    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/curriculum/cali/para_checklist_2008.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Paraprofessionals, Legislation
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Connecticut Preschool Assessment Framework
    Summary:

    The Connecticut Preschool Assessment Framework is a curriculum-embedded tool for assessing 3- and 4-year-old children in their preschool classrooms. It was developed as a companion to the Connecticut Preschool Curriculum Framework (1999) and articulates comprehensive performance standards or learning outcomes. These curriculum and assessment frameworks provide a system for using standards in both planning curricula and assessing children's progress. They enable teachers to plan and implement a curriculum that addresses specific learning standards and to observe and assess children's progress in achieving these standards. This system focuses curriculum planning on standards, or learning outcomes, rather than primarily on activities.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Early/Preschool_Assessment_Framework.pdf

    Content Type:
    Frameworks, Early Childhood, Assessment
    Grade Level:Pre-K, Elementary School
      
      

     

    English Language Learners in CT

    Connecticut Blooms with Cultural and Linguistic Richness

    Students in Connecticut schools speak a diverse array of languages, from Akan and Algonquian to Zande and Zurate. During the 2007-2008 school year, a total of 161 dominant languages were spoken by Connecticut’s public school students in grades K-12. One in seven students had a dominant language other than English (72,417 students in Connecticut’s schools). Of those students, 41.3% were assessed as English Language Learners (28,879 students). For detailed information regarding dominant languages in Connecticut public schools, English Language Learners in Connecticut, identification and services, and the performance of English Language Learners and former English Language Learners, please read the Connecticut Department of Education’s July 2008 Data Bulletin on English Language Learners in CT. [Document available below.]

    Of particular note in the CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs in CT (July 2008) are the performance levels of former English Language Learners as compared to the native English-speaking (non-ELL) students in the same grades. The data indicate that in the 2007-2008 school year, former ELLs (i.e., those students who have exited from ELL status by achieving linguistic proficiency on the designated state testthe LAS Linksand academic proficiency by achieving all grade-level performance standards on all subtests of the CMT) performed “as well or even better than non-ELL students, particularly on the writing section” of the CMT (CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs, July 2008, page 7).

     

    Connecticut State Department of Education
    Division of Assessment and Accountability
    Bureau of Data Collection, Research and Evaluation
    DATA BULLETIN - July 2008

    Connecticut's Framework for RTI: A Family Guide

    Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students


    Teachers, administrators, and families want all children to succeed.  There are many ways to get children who are struggling to learn the additional help they need to be successful.  One way is with the use of “scientific research-based interventions” (SRBI).

    This booklet reviews what SRBI are and includes questions you might want to ask your child’s school or program to learn more about how they are using SRBI as a framework to improve teaching and learning.  Also included here are ways families can be a part of the decision-making process and what to do when you have concerns about your child’s progress.

    Download the Family Guide to RTI (pdf, 494kb)

    CT's Special Education Regulations
    Publication Date:

    2005

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/SpEd_Regs.pdf

     

      
    Content Type:
    Special Education, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT's Procedural Safeguards in Special Education
    Publication Date:

    2006

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Prosaf.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/Prosaf_fullversion.pdf (Full Version)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/DEPS/Special/ProsafSpan.pdf (Spanish)

      
    Content Type:
    Special Education, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT's Model Special Education Policy and Procedures Manual
    Publication Date:

    2007

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/PolicyProceduresManual.pdf

     

      
    Content Type:
    Special Education, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Complaint Resolution Process
    Publication Date:

    2007

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Complaints.pdf (PDF)

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/word_docs/DEPS/Special/Complaints.doc (WORD)

      
    Content Type:
    Complaint Resolution Process, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guide for the Training, Use and Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Aides and Assistants in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guide4TrngUse.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Speech and Language, Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Training and Support of Paraprofessionals
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Paraprofessionals.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Speech and Language Programs
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Speech_Language_2008.pdf
      
  • Speech-Language Eligibility Forms in PDF fill-in format (2008) 
    Early Intervening Services · Evaluation · Fluency · Language · Phonology · PPT Report · Reevaluation · Voice  
  • Supplemental Resource Packet for the Guidelines for Speech and Language Programs (2008) [ZIP]
  • Content Type:
    Speech and Language, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Physical Therapy in Educational Settings
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/PTGuidelines.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Physical Therapy, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Educational Settings
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/OTGuidelines.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Occupational Therapy, ISSS, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Learning Disabilities
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/LDGuide.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    LD, Learning Disabilities, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Intellectual Disability
    Publication Date:

    2007

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/guide_intellectualdisability2007.pdf
      ID Eligibility Documentation Worksheet [PDF] 43KB [Word
    Content Type:
    Intellectual Disability, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying Children with Intellectual Disability - Executive Summary
    Publication Date:

    2006

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/ID_Guidelines_Exec.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Intellectual Disability, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identifying and Educating Students with Serious Emotional Disturbance
    Publication Date:

    1997

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/SEDguide.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Emotional Disturbance, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Identification and Education of Children and Youth with Autism
    Publication Date:

    2005

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Autism.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Autism, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Health Screenings: Vision, Hearing and Postural
    Publication Date:

    2004

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Health_Screenings_CSDE.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Vision, Hearing, Postural, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Feeding and Swallowing Programs in Schools
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Feeding_and_Swallowing.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Feeding and Swallowing, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Developing Policies and Procedures for Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect
    Publication Date:

    2000

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/abuse.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Child Abuse, Neglect, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Student Performance Monitoring Template

    NEW TOOL: You can easily create your own graphs of student performance on academic and behavior objectives to demonstrate the progress that has been made!

    Download the Monitoring Template (hint: right-click the link, choose "Save Target As..." from the menu. 31kb, Requires Microsoft Excel).

    CT Guidelines for In-School and Out-of-School Suspensions
    Summary:

    This guidance document has been written to assist school districts in implementing Section 10-233c of the Connecticut General Statutes. The law will go into effect on July 1, 2009, however it requires that I issue guidelines by October 1, 2008, to aid districts in making the determination about whether suspensions should be in-school or out-of-school. By providing this information now, school boards and building administrators will have time to prepare for and adjust to the changes required by the law and to reassess the effectiveness of their current suspension policies.

    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/pressroom/In_School_Suspension_Guidance.pdf
    Content Type:
    Suspension, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    The Connecticut Plan - School Reform
    Summary:

    Academic and Personal Success for Every Middle and High School Student  

    Reform of Connecticut’s high schools was first identified as a major policy objective in 2001 when Associate Commissioner Sternberg wrote a concept paper describing how high schools might reorganize their practices to engage a new generation of adolescents. The effect of this paper, coupled with additional research and concerns over No Child Left Behind, resulted in the Department sponsoring a statewide conference on high school reform in 2005. This conference launched the work of The Connecticut High School Advisory Committee which developed a "Framework for Connecticut’s High Schools: A Working Guide for High School Redesign." Shortly thereafter, the State Board of Education made high school reform Priority 3 of its 2006 five-year comprehensive plan, "A Superior Education for 21st Century Learners."

    Publication Date:2007
    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/pdf/pressroom/TheConnecticutPlan.pdf
    Content Type:
    School Reform, 21st Century Schools
    Grade Level:Middle School, High School
      
    Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students

    Using Scientific Research-Based Interventions: Improving Education for All Students

    Connecticut's framework for RtI

    Background

    Federal laws have issued clear expectations for schools regarding their obligations to educate diverse groups of students well.  This legislation includes the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA).  NCLB aims to ensure the academic growth and achievement of all students regardless of their race, ethnicity, fluency in English, disability or socioeconomic status.  IDEA 2004 continues the federal mandate, in effect since 1975, for schools to provide all children with disabilities a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) in the least restrictive environment (LRE), and also contains some important revisions with clear implications for general as well as special education.  These revisions encourage the implementation of research-based interventions that facilitate success in the general education setting for a broad range of students.  In particular, school districts are allowed to use a process known as Response to Intervention (RTI) as part of identification procedures for learning disabilities, by far the largest category under which K-12 students in special education are served, roughly half of all special education students nationwide (see www.ideadata.org)

    RTI models grew out of research suggesting that traditional approaches to identifying learning disabilities are seriously flawed and that students sometimes end up in the special education system not due to genuine disabilities, but other factors, such as inadequate general education practices and limited opportunities for extra help for struggling students (e.g., Fletcher et al., 1994; Lyon, 1996; Spear-Swerling and Sternberg, 1996), including those students acquiring English.  RTI involves providing scientific, research-based instruction and intervention matched to student needs, with important educational decisions based on students’ levels of performance and learning rates over time.  Rather than limiting the provision of instructional and social/behavioral supports for those students classified under a particular label or program, supports are provided to allstudents, based on individual needs.

    The basic principles underlying RTI hold considerable promise for helping Connecticut schools to improve education for all students and address the large disparities in performance within the state.  These basic principles have been embraced by the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) for a number of years, as well as supported by state legislation and policy.  Furthermore, numerous ongoing projects and initiatives in Connecticut, such as those involving collaborations among researchers, teacher educators and public schools, provide a strong foundation for the implementation of RTI.

    Download the Connecticut RtI Executive Summary (PDF)

     

     

    Summary Reports for Environment Rating Scales for Program Assessment and Improvement
    A number of states that use the Environment Rating Scales for program assessment and improvement, produce a detailed Summary Report for the staff in the room observed and the facility director on site. The assessor does not provide feedback to the staff at the time of the assessment. In order to fully inform the child care provider and the consultant who will be available for technical assistance, the assessor writes a detailed Summary Report.

    A template for these reports, prepared by Thelma Harms, Ph.D., is available here in two formats:

    Are you using the right assessment instrument for the right child?

    Cognitive Measures

    Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale, Fourth Edition : The Stamford Binet is one of the oldest cognitive measures and is widely used because it taps a broad range of skills. The SB assesses mental abilities in four areas: Verbal reasoning, Abstract Visual Reasoning, Quantitative Comprehension and Short-term Memory. It is used for individuals from age to through adulthood. Publisher: Riverside Publishing Co.

    Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence, Revised: The WPPSI- R is a downward extension of the widely used Wechsler Scales for older children and adults. It can be difficult to administer to young children, and is used only for children between the ages of 3 and 7. Like the other Wechsler Scales, it yields verbal and performance scores. Publisher: Psychological Corporation

    Differential Abilities Scale: The DAS measures conceptual and reasoning abilities in children aged 30 months to 17 years. It includes a preschool level and a school age level. This is a relatively new measure with good psychometric properties, which is used increasingly with preschool aged children. Publisher: Psychological Corporation

    Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery: This is a battery of tests which includes cognitive and achievement measures for use with individuals from age 3 through adulthood. Only a portion of those are applicable to preschoolers. The cognitive portion of the battery likely underestimates cognitive ability, especially in children with language delays. The tests of achievement appear to be of greater use in measuring achievement. Publisher: DLM Teaching Resources

    Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children: The K-ABC has several subscales and can be used with children aged 30 months to 12 years, 5 months. The K-ABC does not include the verbal comprehension or reasoning items In the Mental Processing Composite. It also relies heavily on short term memory and attention skills. It samples a limited set of skills in very young children, and it has a low ceiling. These and other limitations suggest that the K-ABC may not be the best choice for a primary instrument for assessing intellectual ability. Publisher: American Guidance Service

    McCarthy Scales of Children’s Abilities: The McCarthy Scales can be administered to children aged 20 months to 8.5 yrs. They yield a general cognitive index, as well as five subscale scores. The tests are useful in their specification of strengths and weaknesses, and they are appealing to children, but the validity of some scores has been questioned. The norms are also out dated. Publisher: Psychological Corporation

    Merrill-Palmer Scale of Mental Tests: This is an old test which measures primarily non-verbal skills in children aged 18 months to four years. It has non-verbal items not found elsewhere, and is attractive to children. It is occasionally used for those reasons despite the fact that its norms are outdated and result in inflated scores. There is an extended version of the Merrill-Palmer, which includes some of the items from the original scale, and may be of limited use. It lacks adequate psychometric properties at present. Publisher: Stoeltling Co.

    Leiter International Performance Scale- Revised: This is a revision of a non-verbal intelligence scale, originally developed for use with deaf children. The current model can be used with children aged 2 to 20 years, but is used infrequently because it is difficult to administer, score and interpret. Publisher: Stoeltling Co.

    Developmental Measures

    Bayley Scales of Infant Development II: The BSID II is designed to identify cognitive delays in children aged 1 month to 42 months. It yields a Mental Development Index, and a Motor Development Index. It is the most widely used and well respected, norm referenced measure of development for very young children. Publisher: Psychological Corporation.

    Battelle Developmental Inventory: The Battelle evaluates the development of children from infancy to primary levels. It assesses developmental skills in five areas: Personal-Social, Adaptive, Motor, Communication and Cognition. Information is obtained from a combination of structured interaction, observation and caregiver report. Publisher: DLM Teaching Resources

    Mullen Scales of Early Learning: The Mullen measures learning abilities and learning patterns in children aged 1 to 69 months. It is used to identify learning disabilities, mental retardation and learning styles. The Mullen provides scores in four areas: Visual Receptive Organization, Visual Expressive Organization, Language Receptive Organization and Language Expressive Organization. Publisher: T.O.T.A.L. Child.

    Adaptive Behavior Measures

    Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: This is a series of scales based upon parental report which provide an estimate of adaptive functioning in the areas of Socialization, Communication, Daily Living Skills and Motor Skills. It can be used with individuals from birth through adulthood, and is the most widely used of the adaptive behavior measures. Publisher: American Guidance Service

    Scales of Independent Behavior: This scale assesses skills in areas similar to those used on the Vineland. It can be used for individuals from birth through adulthood. Although less research has been done with this tool, it appears to be suitable for use with preschool children. Publisher: DLM Teaching Resources

    Behavior Rating Scales

    Behavior Assessment Scale for Children: The BASC system provides a comprehensive rating scale which yields scores on internalizing behaviors, externalizing behaviors, learning problems and adaptive skills, as well as a behavior problems index. It includes rating forms for parents and teachers, a structured observation schedule and a guide for history taking. The scale is suitable for use with children aged 2 through 18. Publisher: Psychological Corporation

    The Child Behavior Checklist: The CBCL is a rating scale completed by parents or teachers. There is one form for children aged 2-3 and a separate form for children four and older. The scale yields scores on internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Publisher: University of Vermont

    Adapted from Sattler (1992); Bracken, (2000) & Culbertson & Willis, (1993)

    Selected Bibliography of Assessment Resources

    Bagnato, Stephen, Neisworth, John, & Munson, Susan. 1997. Linking Assessment and Early Intervention: An authentic curriculum based approach. Baltimore: Brookes

    Bracken, Bruce. 2000. The Psychoeducational Assessment of Preschool Children, 3rd Ed. Needham Hgts., MA: Allyn & Bacon.

    Culbertson, Jan & Willis, Diane. (Eds.). (1993). Testing Young Children: A reference guide for developmental, psychoeducational, and psychosocial assessments. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.

    Devereaux Foundation, Lebuffe, P.A., Naglieri, J.A., Korelak, D. & Vacca, M.M. (1999). Devereaux Early Childhood Assessment Program: Enhancing Social and Emotional Development. Lewisville, NC: Kaplan Press.

    Gredler, G.R. (2000). Early childhood education - assessment and intervention: What the future holds. Psychology in the Schools, 37, 73-79.

    Gridley, B.E., Mucha, L., & Hatfield, B.B. (1995). Preschool screening. In A Thomas & T. Grimes (Eds.) Best practices in school psychology. Washington, D.C.: National Association of School Psychologists.

    Lerner, J.W., Lowenthal, B & Egan, R. (1998). Preschool Children with Special Needs. Boston: Allyn & Bacon

    Linder, T.W. (1993). Transdisciplinary Play-based Assessment: A functional approach to working with young children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

    McConnell, S., Priest, J. Davis, S. & McEvoy, M. (2000). Best Practices in Measuring growth and Development in Preschool Children. www.nasponline.org/pdf

    McLean, M., Bailey, D.B. & Wollery, M. (Eds.). (1996). Assessing Infants and Preschoolers with Special Needs. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

    Meisels, Samuel & Fenichel, Emily. (Eds.). (1996). New Visions for the Developmental Assessment of Infants and Young Children. Washington, D.C.: ZERO TO THREE.

    Sattler, J. (1992). Assessment of Children, 3rd Edition. San Diego: Jerome Sattler.

    Spodek, Bernard & Saracho, Olivia. (Eds.). (1997). Issues in Early Childhood Educational Assessment and Evaluation. NY: Teachers College Press.

    Q and A: Questions and Answers On Response to Intervention (RTI) and Early Intervening Services (EIS)
    Publication Date:2007
    URL:http://idea.ed.gov/explore/view/p/%2Croot%2Cdynamic%2CQaCorner%2C8%2C
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
    Summary:

    Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
    Summary:

    Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Response to Intervention (RTI): A Primer for Parents
    Summary:

    A major concern for parents as well as teachers is how to help children who experience difficulty in school. All parents want to see their child excel, and it can be very frustrating when a child falls behind in either learning to read, achieving as expected in math and other subjects, or in getting along socially with peers and teachers. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-step approach to providing services and interventions to struggling learners at increasing levels of intensity. RTI allows for early intervention by providing academic and behavioral supports rather than waiting for a child to fail before offering help.

    Some new federal laws have directed schools to focus more on helping all children learn by addressing problems earlier, before the child is so far behind that a referral to special education services is warranted. These laws include the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) of 2004. Both laws underscore the importance of providing high quality, scientifically-based instruction and interventions, and hold schools accountable for the progress of all students in terms of meeting state grade level standards. RTI is a process designed to help schools focus on these high quality interventions while carefully monitoring student progress. The information gained from an RTI process is used by school personnel and parents to inform instruction and to determine the educational needs of the child.

    Publication Date:2007
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/15857
    Content Type:
    Parent Involvement, RTI
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
    Adolescent Literacy and Older Students with Learning Disabilities
    Summary:

    This NJCLD paper addresses critical issues related to the literacy needs of adolescents with LD and advocates for effective reading and writing instruction for these students. To improve adolescent literacy, key areas requiring attention include, but are not limited to, the following:

    1. Research initiatives and implementation of best practices
      1. Assessment;
      2. Use of RTI and other alternative approaches for the purposes of identification, instructional planning, and progress monitoring;
      3. Instructional approaches;
      4. Use of universal design to meet print and digital literacy demands;
      5. Learner profiles.
    2. Professional development planning and practices
      1. Current science and research-informed practices;
      2. Differentiation based on professional roles and responsibilities.
    3. Educational priorities, policies, and practices
      1. Organizational restructuring;
      2. Continuum of services;
      3. Shared responsibility for literacy instruction.
    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/25031
    Content Type:
    Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment
    Student Audience:Special Ed.
    Grade Level:Elementary School
    Subject Area:Language Arts, Writing
    Improving Reading and Writing Skills in Language Arts Courses and Across the Curriculum
    Summary:The 1998 High Schools That Work Assessment contains good and bad news about the reading performance of the 23,900 career-bound students who participated in the assessment at experienced HSTW sites. Based on the findings, this research brief answers the following three questions. What progress are HSTW sites making in advancing students' reading achievement? What conditions are associated with higher reading achievement? How can schools get at least 85 percent of career-bound students to meet the HSTW reading goal?
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/ResearchBrief-ReadingandWriting.pdf
    Content Type:
    Teacher Resources
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, Accountability
    Subject Area:Reading, Writing
    High Schools That Work: Findings from the 1996 and 1998 Assessments
    Summary:This report shows that in a two-year period between 1996 and 1998, High Schools That Work sites significantly increased the percentages of students in their senior classes who met the HSTW achievement goals in mathematics, science and reading and the percentages of students in their senior classes who completed the HSTW-recommended program of study. The report was prepared by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) of Research Triangle Park, N.C., for the U.S. Department of Education, Planning and Evaluation Service. It contains many tables and appendices based on the data.
    Publication Date:April 2001
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/ResearchReports/RTI_study.pdf
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models
    7: Curriculum and Instruction top

    High-performing schools have aligned curriculum with core learning expectations to improve the performance of all students.  Students achieve high standards through rigorous, challenging learning.  Staff delivers an aligned curriculum and implements research-based teaching and learning strategies.  Students are actively involved in their learning through inquiry, in-depth learning, and performance assessments.

    The 90 Minute Reading Block
    Summary:

    Presentation providing guidance for district and school administrators, reading coaches, and teachers at the elementary level in developing and implementing a 90 minute reading block. Though originally designed for delivery to reading coaches, this presentation may be helpful to all elementary educators implementing a reading block.

    Publication Date:2010
    URL:http://info.fldoe.org/justread/90-minute-block-presentation.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT School Health Survey 1997-2007

    The Connecticut School Health Survey (CSHS) is comprised of two components: the Youth Tobacco Component (YTC), and the Youth Behavior Component (YBC). Some encouraging signs were seen in the 2007 survey year, including an increase in seatbelt use since 1997, a decrease in drinking and driving, and a decrease in use of inhalants to get high.

    Follow the links below for more information.

    CT School Health Survey Fact Sheet

    2007 CT School Health Survey Report (Large PDF)

     

    Beyond the Blueprint: Literacy in Grades 4-12
    Publication Date:

    2007

     Summary:

    The Connecticut State Department of Education’s Beyond the Blueprint:  Literacy in Grades 4-12 and Across the Content Areas, an extension of Connecticut’s K-3 Blueprint for Reading Achievement, is for all educators, parents/guardians, and community members interested in providing systematic, ongoing literacy programming for students in grades 4-12.  Comprehensive in its offerings, this document provides conclusions and recommendations, student and teacher competencies, instructional models and strategies, assessments, and resources and references.  Beyond the Blueprint provides a broader, deeper, well-informed research-based orientation required to help older students develop into highly literate citizens.
    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2618&Q=321834

      
    Content Type:
    Curriculum and Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Terms Related to English Language Learners

    Terms Related to English Language Learners and their Common Uses (SERC, Nov. 2008)


    BICS

    Basic Interpersonal Communication Skills (conversational language) [Cummins]

    CALP

    Cognitive Academic Language Proficiency (academic language) [Cummins]

    Context-embedded

    Quadrant B (contextual clues) [Cummins]

    Context-reduced

    Quadrant D (no or very few contextual clues) [Cummins]

    CUP

    Common Underlying Proficiency (vs. Separate Underlying Proficiency)

    Affective Filter

    One of Krashen’s 5 Hypotheses built on SLA processes/needs [Krashen]

    Comprehensible Input

    One of Krashen’s 5 Hypotheses built on SLA processes/needs [Krashen]

    SLA

    Second Language Acquisition (a process)

    ELL

    English Language Learner (a learner)

    LEP

    Limited English Proficiency (describes proficiency; sometimes used to describe a learner)

    ESL

    English as a Second Language (a program; a class; sometimes used to describe a learner)

    ESOL

    English Speaker(s) of Other Languages (a learner; sometimes a field of study/program/class)

    TESOL

    Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (field of study/practice/certification)

    ELD

    English Language Development (a program or class; a process)

    ELP

    English Language Proficiency

    SI

    Sheltered Instruction (methodology/model of instruction; not a separate program)

    SIOP

    Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (an observation protocol for SI)
    [Echevarria, Short, Vogt]

    SDAIE

    Specially-Designed Academic Instruction in English (methodology/model of instruction)

    CBI

    Content-Based Instruction (methodology/model of instruction)

    LAS Links

    Language Assessment System (LAS) Links (language proficiency test in CT, annual measure)

    NNS

    Non-Native Speaker (a learner)

    NES

    Non-English Speaker (a learner; descriptor on the LAS test formerly used in CT annually)

    LES

    Limited English Speaker (a learner; descriptor on the LAS test formerly used in CT annually)

    FES

    Fluent English Speaker (a learner; descriptor on the LAS test formerly used in CT annually)

    NL

    Native Language (a learner’s home, first, or original dominant language)

    TL

    Target Language (the language to be acquired/learned)

    L1

    First Language (a learner’s home, first, or original dominant language)

    L2

    Second Language (used to describe a learner’s second language/language to be acquired/the target language)

    TAT

    Training for All Teachers (a program/curriculum that teaches Second Language Acquisition and Sheltered Instruction principles and strategies to all teachers, in particular general education teachers) [TAT (offered by Southern Connecticut State University) is funded by a federal grant from the Office of English Language Acquisition.]

    Project Ex-CELL

    Excellence for Connecticut’s English Language Learners (a program/curriculum that teaches about English Language Development and SDAIE principles and strategies to all teachers, in particular general education teachers) [Project Ex-CELL (offered by UCLA-SMP) is funded by a federal grant from the Office of English Language Acquisition.]

    (National) TESOL

    Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (national organization)

    ConnTESOL

    Connecticut TESOL (state organization; local affiliate of National TESOL)

    CAPELL

    Connecticut Administrators of Programs for English Language Learners (statewide organization of school administrators, coordinators, & teachers)

    WIDA Consortium

    18 states & Washington D.C.; Consortium-developed ELP Standards (includes content areas); Consortium-developed language proficiency test – ACCESS for ELLs

    ELPCR Consortium

    6 states; each state its has own ELP standards; these states use a common language proficiency test – Language Assessment System (LAS) Links [CTB-McGraw Hill]

    CSDE ELL Framework

    CT’s ELL Framework (State Board approved 11/05, separate from content area frameworks)

    OELA

    Office of English Language Acquisition (U.S. Dept. of Education)

    OCR

    Office for Civil Rights (U.S. Dept. of Justice)

    DI

    Differentiated Instruction

    ETS

    Effective Teaching Strategies, CALI module

     

    English Language Learners in CT

    Connecticut Blooms with Cultural and Linguistic Richness

    Students in Connecticut schools speak a diverse array of languages, from Akan and Algonquian to Zande and Zurate. During the 2007-2008 school year, a total of 161 dominant languages were spoken by Connecticut’s public school students in grades K-12. One in seven students had a dominant language other than English (72,417 students in Connecticut’s schools). Of those students, 41.3% were assessed as English Language Learners (28,879 students). For detailed information regarding dominant languages in Connecticut public schools, English Language Learners in Connecticut, identification and services, and the performance of English Language Learners and former English Language Learners, please read the Connecticut Department of Education’s July 2008 Data Bulletin on English Language Learners in CT. [Document available below.]

    Of particular note in the CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs in CT (July 2008) are the performance levels of former English Language Learners as compared to the native English-speaking (non-ELL) students in the same grades. The data indicate that in the 2007-2008 school year, former ELLs (i.e., those students who have exited from ELL status by achieving linguistic proficiency on the designated state testthe LAS Linksand academic proficiency by achieving all grade-level performance standards on all subtests of the CMT) performed “as well or even better than non-ELL students, particularly on the writing section” of the CMT (CSDE Data Bulletin on ELLs, July 2008, page 7).

     

    Connecticut State Department of Education
    Division of Assessment and Accountability
    Bureau of Data Collection, Research and Evaluation
    DATA BULLETIN - July 2008

    Connecticut's Blueprint For Reading Achievement
    Publication Date:

    2000

     Summary:

    The Report of the Early Reading Success Panel
    Connecticut State Department of Education -- 2000
    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2618&q=320850

      
    Content Type:
    Curriculum and Instruction, Early Literacy
    Grade Level:Early Education, Elementary School
      
      
    CSDE Tools for Curriculum and Instruction
    Publication Date:

    2008

     Summary:CSDE Tools for Curriculum and Instruction includes a guide for district curriculum development to help identify next steps in the process and a walk-through protocol guide that can be focused for your building or district initiatives.
    URL:

    Connecticut Curriculum Development Guide

    Connecticut Walkthrough Protocol Guide

      
    Content Type:
    Curriculum and Instruction
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Typical Speech and Language Development for School-Age Children

    A Checklist for School Nurses

    Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D., CCC

    School nurses, particularly those in elementary schools, may have the broadest perspective of the students in their building, as they can observe children grow and communicate in various settings over multiple years. Their experience with typical development is a valuable reference point for appraising speech and language skills in children with disabilities as well as those presenting indications of being at risk. As school nurses have frequent contact with teachers, other student support services professionals, and families, they can be instrumental in sharing information about speech and language concerns. Their perspective and input can be influential in preventing speech and language problems, intervening early, or facilitating referral for a speech and language evaluation if needed.

    During hearing, vision, and scoliosis screenings, school nurses have occasions, albeit brief, to engage in conversation. Sick visits to the nurse often result in more extended interactions. Although these situations may not reliably reflect a child’s day-to-day speech and language skills, they can yield useful information. Explaining physical symptoms or describing a playground accident are demanding communicative contexts for children, as they must be able to convey both the past and the present, what they have experienced, and what they are currently feeling, through words, gestures, or facial expressions.

    A checklist of typical speech and language milestones for school-age children in preschool through grade 6 has been developed especially for school nurses as part of SERC’s professional development training, The Nursing Component of the IEP.

    Click here for a printable version of Typical Speech and Language Development for School-Age Children: A Checklist for School Nurses (Portable Document Format (.pdf), 138kb)

    A note of caution for school nurses using the checklist …

    • keep in mind that there are no clear dividing lines between the stages of speech and language development, and
    • child’s speech and language skills must be viewed relative to the cultural norms of the community.
    Vocabulary Instruction Through Stories and Expansion

    “Promising Practice” Ideas for Closing Connecticut’s Achievement Gaps

    Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D., CCC

    Vocabulary proficiency has been documented to be a primary predictor in learning to read, and, subsequently, reading to learn in the content areas. As established by researchers Betty Hart and Todd Risley in "Meaningful Differences in the Lives of …" (1995), administrators, general and special educators, and student support services professionals cannot assume that all children come to school having had sufficient opportunities listening to and experimenting with words.

    Linking vocabulary instruction to stories using word origins is a viable teaching approach that is appealing to students at all grade levels. It is also effective, as typically developing and at-risk students, as well as those with identified special education needs, can rely on the narrative structure of the story to learn vocabulary. This process aids recall and use of words in meaningful contexts related to the curriculum.

    How To Link Words With Stories

    Identify the origin of key curricular vocabulary. Dictionaries provide some of this information, but it is also accessible on the Web using a site such as www.wordorigins.org. See the examples below for some ideas. Initially present information about how the word originated or has changed over time. Then develop these ideas into a story appropriate for the students’ grade, interests, and culture. Alternatively, students can develop their own original stories in oral, written, or dramatic forms, individually or in cooperative groups.

    Some Vocabulary Examples

    “Hocus-pocus” is known to modern day children as a phrase that produces magical results. “Hocus-Pocus” was actually the name of an early-17th century English juggler who captivated his audience by incorporating the word into his act.

    The word “posh” dates back to the 1920s. This acronym for Port Out, Starboard Home was printed on the tickets of first-class ocean liner passengers traveling from England to India. The port side of the ship had the coolest cabins and best view on the way to India. The starboard cabins had the same advantage on the return voyage. From this word origin, “posh” came to mean elegant, luxurious, or fashionable.

    “Deadline” originally had a literal meaning. During the Civil War, a line was drawn on the ground indicating the perimeter of makeshift prisoner-of-war camps. Prisoners who crossed the deadline met their demise. It was not until the 1920s that the meaning of “deadline” as a time limit became part of newspaper jargon.

    “Sorts” were individual wooden letter tiles used in the 18th century to set type for announcements and newspapers. Typesetters were known to become irritable when they were “out of sorts.” As the printing industry modernized and “sorts” became obsolete, the phrase continued its association with a bad disposition.

    Expanding Vocabulary

    “Deadline” and “out of sorts” are Americanisms, but most American words, as well as those from other cultures (e.g., Spanish), originate from Latin, Greek, German, or Anglo-Saxon derivations. Teachers across all content areas can help children expand their vocabulary by:

    1. establishing the etymological base of a word (i.e., tracing the root word back as far as possible to its original language source),
    2. applying knowledge of the word’s origin to contemporary usage, emphasizing its application in the context of the lesson, and
    3. systematically bridging from simple to more complex or obscure forms or applying the word to other contexts.
    A Vocabulary Expansion Example

    “Sign” derives from the Latin word signum, meaning “mark.” This serves as the root for words such as signal, signature, signify, significant, signet (an official mark on a document), and signatory (the person who signs an official document). Other derivations common to this word are sign up, sign off, and sign away. An understanding of this single root word has applications across the grades and several content area subjects.

    As teachers introduce the essential vocabulary of a content unit or work of literature, they can expose students to many words simultaneously. This differentiates instruction and provides opportunities for students of various ability levels to access the curriculum. The approach also helps to demystify the English language, connect roots words across cultures and languages, and has the added benefit of improving the probability of spelling accuracy. It can be beneficial for all students, but has particular applicability for English Language Learners and those students with vocabulary weaknesses or gaps.

    Be sure to also visit SERC’s Integrated Student Support Services (ISSS) Initiative Web page for vocabulary instruction technology links.

    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Resources for speech-language pathologists

    Presented at ASHA, November, 2007 by Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D., CCC, SERC Consultant

    Connecticut’s Survey of Speech-Language Pathologists: Philosophy to Practice

     

    Integrating Speech and Language Interventions in Kindergarten: Co-teaching Applications

    Presented by Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D., SERC, Lisa Smith-Horn, and Deborah Beveridge, South Windsor Public Schools

    Early Childhood Education Initiative: Publications and Related Websites

    Greater Expectations: Connecticut’s Comprehensive Plan for Education 2001-2005
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/whatsnew/greater_expectations.pdf
    This comprehensive plan addresses one part of the State Board of Education’s statutory requirement to provide leadership to school districts with respect to preschool, elementary and secondary education, special education, vocational education and adult education by developing a comprehensive plan every 5 years.

    Connecticut’s Blueprint for Reading Achievement
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/dtl/curriculum/currcbra.htm
    This is the report of the Early Reading Success Panel, published by the CT State Department of Education in 2000. It contains a general overview of basic research finding about reading and specifies the competencies required for reading success for children in kindergarten through grade 3.

    Early Literacy Development: A Focus on Preschool http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/literacy.pdf
    This CT State Department of Education concept paper examines what literacy is, how to promote literacy with preschoolers and how to assess literacy development.

    Connecticut’s Preschool Curriculum Framework and Benchmarks for Children in Preschool Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/Frmwrkbench.pdf
    This State Department of Education, Bureau of Early Childhood Education and Social Services document outlines content standards and performance indicators in the areas of personal and social development, physical development, cognitive development and creative expression/aesthetic development

    “Family Friendly” Services for Preschool Special Education
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/friendly.pdf
    The purpose of this guide is to provide guiding principles, recommended practices and tools which school district preschool special education personnel can use to provide “family friendly” services.

    Preschool Special Education Program
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/pssed.pdf
    This outline of the CT State Department of Education’s Bureau of Early Childhood Education and Social Services program for preschoolers with special needs describes its purpose, philosophy, eligibility and legislative authority.

    A Guide to Using the Position Statement on School-Family-Community Partnerships in Early Care and Education Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/readiness/alerts/TA-SR-00-01guide.pdf
    This document examines how to develop comprehensive school-family-community partnerships in preschool settings. It looks at six partnership standards and offers sample activities.

    Position Statement on School-Family-Community Partnerships
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/board/partnerships.pdf
    This CT State Board of Education Position Statement encourages schools to develop comprehensive school-family-community partnerships by developing programs related to six standards.

    CT State Board of Education – Position Statement on Preschool Services and Programs
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde/deps/early/PreschoolPositionStatement.pdf
    This State Board of Education position statement outlines the qualities of preschool programs and activities which will maximize the development of preschoolers.

    Other Links of Interest:

    Accreditation Facilitation Project (AFP) http://www.ctcharts-a-course.org/accreditationf.htm

    Commission On Children http://www.cga.state.ct.us/coc

    CT Department of Public Health Child Day Care Licensing Program http://www.dph.state.ct.us/BRS/Day_Care/day_care.htm

    CT Voices for Children Website http://www.ctkidslink.org

    CT-Charts-A-Course http://www.ctcharts-a-course.org

    DSS Child Care Team http://www.dss.state.ct.us/ccare/ccare.htm

    Hartford Area Child Care Collaborative http://www.hartnet.org/haccc/

    Hartford Association for the Education of Young Children http://www.haeyc.org

    Dialogue on Early Childhood Science, Mathematics and Technology Education
    http://www.project2061.org/tools/earlychild

     

    •The Annie E. Casey Fondation
    http://www.aecf.org
    •GreatKids CT
    http://www.greatkidsCT.org
    •Children's Defense Fund
    http://www.childrensdefense.org
    •Infoline
    http://www.infoline.org
    •CT Birth to Three System
    http://www.birth23.org
    •National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
    http://www.naeyc.org
    •CT Parent Advocacy Center (CPAC)
    http://www.cpacinc.org
    •National Childcare Information Center
    http://www.nccic.org
    •CT State Department of Education
    http://www.state.ct.us/sde
    •National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System
    http://nectas.unc.edu
    •The Division for Early Childhood (DEC)
    http://www.dec-sped.org
    •National Head Start Association
    http://www.nhsa.org
    •ERIC Clearinghouse on Elementary and Early Childhood Education
    http://www.ericeece.org
    •Zero to Three
    http://www.zerotothree.org
    Literacy Blocks Resources
    Summary:

    Articles

    • Fisher, D. (2001). “We’re moving on up”: creating a schoolwide literacy effort in an urban high school. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 45 (2), 92-101.
    • Geiken, N., Larson, J., Van Deusen, J. (1999). Block scheduling: Opportunities and challenges for collaboration. Teacher Librarian, 27 (1), 26-31.
     Books
    • Robbins, P., Gregory, G., & Herndon, L. E. (2000). Thinking inside the block schedule: Strategies for teaching in extended periods of time. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
    • Canady, R. L., Rettig, M. D. (1995). Block scheduling: A catalyst for change in high school. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Marshak, D. (1997). Action research on block scheduling. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Morrow, L. M. (2003). Organizing & managing the language arts block: A professional development guide. New York, NY: The Guildford Press.
    • Cunningham, P. & Allington, R. (2003). Classrooms that work: They can all read and write. Lebanon, IN: Pearson Education.
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
     
     
      
      
      
    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block
    Summary:

    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block

    Publication Date:2005
    URL:http://www.justreadflorida.com/90-minute-chart.asp
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Adolescent Literacy and Older Students with Learning Disabilities
    Summary:

    This NJCLD paper addresses critical issues related to the literacy needs of adolescents with LD and advocates for effective reading and writing instruction for these students. To improve adolescent literacy, key areas requiring attention include, but are not limited to, the following:

    1. Research initiatives and implementation of best practices
      1. Assessment;
      2. Use of RTI and other alternative approaches for the purposes of identification, instructional planning, and progress monitoring;
      3. Instructional approaches;
      4. Use of universal design to meet print and digital literacy demands;
      5. Learner profiles.
    2. Professional development planning and practices
      1. Current science and research-informed practices;
      2. Differentiation based on professional roles and responsibilities.
    3. Educational priorities, policies, and practices
      1. Organizational restructuring;
      2. Continuum of services;
      3. Shared responsibility for literacy instruction.
    Publication Date:2008
    URL:http://www.ldonline.org/article/25031
    Content Type:
    Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment
    Student Audience:Special Ed.
    Grade Level:Elementary School
    Subject Area:Language Arts, Writing
    The Gateway to Educational Materials
    Summary:The Gateway to Educational Materials is a Consortium effort to provide educators with quick and easy access to thousands of educational resources found on various federal, state, university, non-profit, and commercial Internet sites. Teachers, parents, administrators can search or browse The Gateway and find thousands of high quality educational materials, including lesson plans, activities, and projects from over 320 of the 518 GEM Consortium members.
    URL:http://www.thegateway.org/
    Content Type:
    Teacher Resources, Lesson Design
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
    Subject Area:Communication, Science, Reading, Language Arts, Writing, Mathematics
    Improving Reading and Writing Skills in Language Arts Courses and Across the Curriculum
    Summary:The 1998 High Schools That Work Assessment contains good and bad news about the reading performance of the 23,900 career-bound students who participated in the assessment at experienced HSTW sites. Based on the findings, this research brief answers the following three questions. What progress are HSTW sites making in advancing students' reading achievement? What conditions are associated with higher reading achievement? How can schools get at least 85 percent of career-bound students to meet the HSTW reading goal?
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/publications/briefs/ResearchBrief-ReadingandWriting.pdf
    Content Type:
    Teacher Resources
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, Accountability
    Subject Area:Reading, Writing
    High Schools That Work: Findings from the 1996 and 1998 Assessments
    Summary:This report shows that in a two-year period between 1996 and 1998, High Schools That Work sites significantly increased the percentages of students in their senior classes who met the HSTW achievement goals in mathematics, science and reading and the percentages of students in their senior classes who completed the HSTW-recommended program of study. The report was prepared by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) of Research Triangle Park, N.C., for the U.S. Department of Education, Planning and Evaluation Service. It contains many tables and appendices based on the data.
    Publication Date:April 2001
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/ResearchReports/RTI_study.pdf
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models
    Every Child Mathematically Proficient: An Action Plan of the Learning First Alliance
    Summary:The knowledge and use of mathematics is essential in our lives, and, therefore, learning mathematics is central to elementary and secondary education. American students, however, continue to lag behind their world peers in mathematics achievement. Furthermore, substantial achievement gaps exist between groups of our students. Together, we have a major challenge to raise achievement throughout our nation. The Learning First Alliance, therefore, advances this Action Plan to bring American students to world class levels in mathematics. ...
    Publication Date:November 1998
    URL:http://www.learningfirst.org/lfa-web/rp?pa=doc
    Content Type:
    Instruction, Curriculum, Assessment
    Grade Level:Elementary School, High School, Middle School
    Subject Area:Mathematics
    What do Co-Teaching and Sports Cars Have in Common?

    At a recent SERC workshop on co-teaching, teachers from districts across the state participated in a cooperative learning structure called Corners, developed by Kagan Publishing and Professional Development (1995). Corners is a quick and easy activity that helps participants see a variety of viewpoints, and helps them examine a topic in ways they might not previously have considered.

    Thoughts on Collaboration for 21st Century School Professionals

    Thoughts on Collaboration for 21st Century School Professionals…
    Moving Forward or Lost in Space?

    Marilyn Friend, Ph.D.
    Professor and Chair
    Department of Specialized Education Services
    University of North Carolina Greensboro

         Recently on the news, a NASA official was being interviewed about the progress being made on the construction of the International Space Station, including the opportunities it will present and the problems being encountered. One of the most remarkable comments he made went something like this: “It’s a lot more complicated than we realized working with 16 other nations on a project of this magnitude. It’s going to take longer, cost more, and require a lot of patience on everybody’s part, but eventually we will be successful.” What the official did not say is equally enlightening:

    Modeling: The Heart of Instruction

    The State Department of Education’s Common Core of Teaching calls for teacher competence to, “employ a variety of instructional strategies that enable students to think critically, solve problems and demonstrate skills…”

    Six Approaches to Co-Teaching

    In their book, Interactions:  Collaboration Skills for School Professionals, Marilyn Friend and Lynne Cook identify "co-teaching as a specific service delivery option that is based on collaboration." As a service delivery option, co-teaching is designed to meet the educational needs of students with diverse learning options.

    Co-Teaching: An Evolving Role for Speech-Language Pathologists

    Donna D. Merritt, Ph.D.
    SERC consultant

    Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have long recognized the importance of reducing fragmentation of service by collaborating with families and teachers. Simply put, children, youth, and young adults make more substantial gains in their communication skills when programming efforts are coordinated and when they relate to the academic and social contexts of school and home. Within schools, co-teaching offers flexible approaches for SLPs to collaborate with team members, particularly general and special education teachers.

    8: Professional Development top

    Ongoing professional development aligned with the school’s common focus and high expectations to improve the performance of all students is critical in high-performing schools.  These professional development offerings are focused and informed by research and school/classroom-based assessments.  Appropriate instructional support and resources are provided to implement approaches and techniques learned through professional development.

    A Guide to Common Core State Standards-Based IEPs

    This multimedia presentation is designed to provide a tool and a process for helping Connecticut educators develop standards-based IEPs.

    word bank screen shot

    It is presented in three parts:

     

     

     

     

     

     

    If you're having difficulty viewing the presentations, you'll need the most recent version of Adobe's Flash Player installed in your browser, and a broadband Internet connection.

    Directions for the Tutorials


    This presentation provides instruction on a tool that promotes the design of standards-based IEP goals and objectives.  This presentation can be used for individual, small group, or full staff professional development.  The training is broken up into three separate parts that are sectioned into components intended to be used sequentially.  Each module contains hands-on opportunities to apply the skills taught in the presentation.  The three parts can be viewed in either a single sitting or over several sittings.  If you choose to view them in a single sitting, the total recommended time for viewing the presentations and the completion of the hands-on activities is 3 hours.  If you choose to view them in more than one sitting, it is recommended that you plan to complete at least one part in its entirety within a sitting.  It is also recommended that each sitting occurs reasonably close in time to maintain the flow and continuity of the learning.  E.g., Part 1 is viewed on Monday; parts 2 and 3 are viewed on Tuesday.  Listed below are the recommended times for each part.


    Part 1:  1 ½ hours

    Part 2: ½ hour

    Part 3: 1 hour

    Before Using This Tutorial:

    • Select a specific student to use as a case study
    • Obtain a copy of the district curriculum or Common Core State Standards frameworks in any subject area, matching the grade level of the selected student; Click here for a copy of the Connecticut Frameworks.
    • Obtain a copy of the student’s IEP
    • Download the tool here

    Tips for Selecting a Case Study:

    • Determine if a single student case study should be used across all groups or if multiple cases should be used
    • Select cases that relate to the grade levels of the participants
    • Select cases that represent the typical scenarios in your district (i.e., use a “Goldilocks” rule: not too easy, not too hard)
    • Consider using students who have attended the school or district in which the participants are employed
    • Consider having participants volunteer to select their own cases
    • Remember to respect confidentiality and the integrity of the IEP process; change names of students ahead of time and inform participants that all programming changes for any student must be done through the IEP process outside of this training

     

    Suggestions for Group Use:

    • Planning Ahead
      • Select facilitators for the session relative to the size of the total audience
      • Preview the tutorials ahead of time to assist in the organization and planning
      • Plan sufficient time for viewing, completing the activities, and discussing learning
      • If viewing over multiple sessions, plan each sitting close in time, e.g. over three consecutive days
      • Provide participant learning objectives or a purpose for the training, along with a brief description of Word Bank and how the training will be organized prior to the session
      • Copy all materials needed ahead of time
      • Determine if CEUs will be offered through your district
    • Organizing Participants and Space
      • Consider the size of the group carefully, relative to space available and number of facilitators; this training has been done for up to 50 participants at a time
      • Organize participants in teams of 2 to 5 prior to the session and have each team work together
      • Use a comfortable space and seating for adults with sufficient room for the facilitators to be able to roam
    • Organizing the Viewing
      • Viewing Using a Computer Lab
        • Pre-load or set up each computer with the tutorials prior to the session
        • Determine how the session will be paced across the groups
        • Use only pairs or trios for participant groupings
        • Provide directions and timing to the whole group and then allow groups to work at their own pace
        • Facilitators should roam to assist the groups
      • Viewing Whole Group
        • Have an LCD projector and a screen to project the modules to allow for simultaneous viewing
        • Have an adequate sound system to allow for everyone to hear comfortably
        • Group participants in small teams of 3 to 5
        • Arrange the room with multiple tables with 3 to 5 chairs around each table
        • Have one main facilitator lead the directions and pacing
        • Have other facilitators roam to assist the groups
      • Alternative Ways to View
        • Study Groups
          • Pre-set groups of 3 to 5 participants to work together
          • Provide either a set timeframe for completion within which participants can schedule viewing times on their own or establish scheduled blocks of time that participants can use to view
          • Determine locations and arrangement for viewing; locations can be spread out
        • Multiple Small Groups in Different Locations at the Same Time
          • Assign a facilitator to lead each group
          • Provide the facilitators with directions and a preview prior to the session
          • Provide a set location, materials, and viewing arrangements for each small group
          • Provide a set starting and ending time
          • Have one or more facilitators roam across the multiple groups and locations during the scheduled sessions
    Think outside the clock: Create time for professional learning.
    Summary:

    This article presents suggestions about creating staff development time in schools.  The author describes three ways a school district in Marietta, GA creatively found time for their  staff development, then also presents issues and suggestions offered by consultants who have worked with school systems on this issue. School administrators and teachers can use this article as a way to start discussions on finding staff development time in their schools.

    Publication Date:2002
    URL:http://www.nsdc.org/library/publications/tools/tools8-02rich.cfm
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Best Practices for School Counseling in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

    2001

    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/BestPractices.pdf

     

      
    Content Type:
    ISSS, School Counseling
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guide for the Training, Use and Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Aides and Assistants in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guide4TrngUse.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Speech and Language, Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Training and Support of Paraprofessionals
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Paraprofessionals.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Adult Learning Theory: Titles Available at the SERC Library

    The SERC Library has multiple resources pertaining to adult learning theory.  Visit the Library today. Here are a couple of examples, chosen by SERC consultants.

     

    Hayden, P., Frederick, L. & Smith, B.J. (2003). A road map for facilitating collaborative teams. Longmont, CO: Sopris West.

    This 166-page manual provides reasons and resources for creating collaborative teams to promote meaningful change in early childhood care and educational systems. Using a "journey" theme, this is a step-by-step guide for implementing a Collaborative Planning Project (CPP), a responsive and inclusive research-based model. Among the book's features: Strategies, activities, and reproducible forms that any interagency group or individual agency can use to create a CPP; instructions for adapting the CPP model; and resources for team facilitators.

     

    Tate, M. (2004). Sit & get” won’t grow dendrites: 20 professional learning strategies that engage the adult brain. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

    This staff development resource draws on the latest research in brain-based learning, differentiated instruction, multiple intelligences, and adult learning to provide strategies that not only motivate adult learners but also increase understanding and long-term retention. The author defines each strategy, explains its theoretical framework, provides multiple professional learning activities that staff developers can incorporate immediately, and includes a guided reflection and application section.

     

     

     

     

    Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement
    Summary:

    Report on the Imperative for Professional Development in Education

    In this publication, released by the Albert Shanker Institute in conjunction with a professional development forum cosponsored with Achieve, Inc. (see below), Harvard professor Richard Elmore argues that education reforms that are based on standards and accountability will fail unless policymakers also adopt a strategy to ensure that educators have the knowledge and skill they need to help students succeed. The bottom line, says Elmore, is not in issues of governance and process, but in how the quality of instructional practice affects student learning.

    Publication Date:2002
    URL:

    http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/Bridging_Gap.pdf

    Content Type:
    Professional Development
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Building a New Structure For School Leadership
    Summary:

    Public schools and schools systems, as they are presently constituted, are simply not led in ways that enable them to respond to the increasing demands they face under standardsbased reform. Further, if schools, school systems, and their leaders respond to standards based reforms the way they have responded to other attempts at broad scale reform of public education over the past century, they will fail massively and visibly, with an attendant loss of public confidence and serious consequences for public education. The way out of this problem is through the large scale improvement of instruction, something public education has been unable to do to date, but which is possible with dramatic changes in the way public schools define and practice leadership.

    Publication Date:2000
    URL:

    http://www.ashankerinst.org/Downloads/building.pdf

    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Leadership
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development
    Summary:

    This Best Practice Model for School Leader Evaluation and Professional Development is designed to use multiple sources of data systematically collected by teachers and administrators, through the process of teacher evaluation and professional development. The school leader, in turn, analyzes this information and uses it as the basis of his/her own evaluation and professional development.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:

    http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/cwp/view.asp?a=2653&q=320412

    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Leadership
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
    Summary:

    Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
    Summary:

    Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Learning Community
    Summary:

    Schools that function successfully as professional learning communities are able to readily acclimate and respond to new policies and other changes. In a professional learning community, teachers and administrators (1) share a vision focused on student learning, (2) share leadership and decision making, and (3) work and learn together as they continually examine instructional practices — all of which are supported by strong personal and professional relationships, time for collaboration, and good communication.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_proflrncommfolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block
    Summary:

    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block

    Publication Date:2005
    URL:http://www.justreadflorida.com/90-minute-chart.asp
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Models of Professional Development

    In designing effective professional development, we try not to relegate ourselves to the standard "Sit & Get" model of content delivery. The same dynamic teaching and learning theory that we hope to see empowering our classrooms should be used to inform our professional development. What follows is a list of many of the other models of professional development that have proven effective for adult learners in general, and educators in particular.

    Build a bridge between workshop and classroom (external link)
    Summary:
    This article discusses the value of follow-up activities after professional development, and discusses practical methods for implementing them in a typical school/pd setting.
     URL: http://www.nsdc.org/library/publications/tools/tools10-03rich.cfm
     Content Type:
     Teacher and Administrator Resources
     Grade Level:
     All
     Reform Elements:
     Professional Development, Highly Qualified Teachers
    Effective Professional Development: Principles and Beliefs

    Effective professional development is an essential and indispensable process, without which schools and programs cannot hope to achieve their desired goals for student achievement.

    9: Time and Structure top

    High-performing schools are flexibly structured to maximize the use of time and accommodate the varied lives of their students, staff, and community in order to improve the performance of all students.  The structure of programs extends beyond the traditional school day and year as well as beyond the school building.  The program draws on the entire community’s resources to foster student achievement.

    The 90 Minute Reading Block
    Summary:

    Presentation providing guidance for district and school administrators, reading coaches, and teachers at the elementary level in developing and implementing a 90 minute reading block. Though originally designed for delivery to reading coaches, this presentation may be helpful to all elementary educators implementing a reading block.

    Publication Date:2010
    URL:http://info.fldoe.org/justread/90-minute-block-presentation.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School
      
      
    CT Guide for the Training, Use and Supervision of Speech-Language Pathology Aides and Assistants in Connecticut
    Publication Date:

    1999

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guide4TrngUse.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Speech and Language, Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    CT Guidelines for Training and Support of Paraprofessionals
    Publication Date:

    2008

    URL:http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Special/Guidelines_Paraprofessionals.pdf
      
    Content Type:
    Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, Guidelines
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Promising Practices in CT Schools
    Summary:

    Promising Practices in CT Schools

    Publication Date:Current
    URL:

    http://www.csde.state.ct.us/public/der/promisingpractices/index.htm

    Content Type:
    Promising Practices in Schools
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Development
    Summary:

    Three key elements of effective professional development programs are described; these elements capture the characteristics of these programs that are critical for sustaining improvement. First, professional development programs that contribute to sustained improvement are relevant to ongoing improvement initiatives. Second, they are long term and integrated into daily practice. Finally, they provide teachers with targeted, timely feedback about their use of the knowledge and skills acquired through professional development.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_profdevfolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Data-Driven Decision Making
    Summary:

    Although the exact nature of data collection, analysis, and use may vary from school to school, the key elements of an effective data program include (1) purposeful data collection and analysis; (2) designated resources and other supports, such as time and an appropriate data management system; and (3) strategies for communicating about the process of data collection and use as well as the findings. Each of these elements is discussed in the sections that follow.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_datafolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership, Data-Driven Decision Making
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    SUSTAINING SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT: Professional Learning Community
    Summary:

    Schools that function successfully as professional learning communities are able to readily acclimate and respond to new policies and other changes. In a professional learning community, teachers and administrators (1) share a vision focused on student learning, (2) share leadership and decision making, and (3) work and learn together as they continually examine instructional practices — all of which are supported by strong personal and professional relationships, time for collaboration, and good communication.

    Publication Date:2006
    URL:http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/LeadershipOrganizationDevelopment/5031TG_proflrncommfolio.pdf
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Professional Learning Community, Leadership
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Literacy Blocks Resources
    Summary:

    Articles

    • Fisher, D. (2001). “We’re moving on up”: creating a schoolwide literacy effort in an urban high school. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 45 (2), 92-101.
    • Geiken, N., Larson, J., Van Deusen, J. (1999). Block scheduling: Opportunities and challenges for collaboration. Teacher Librarian, 27 (1), 26-31.
     Books
    • Robbins, P., Gregory, G., & Herndon, L. E. (2000). Thinking inside the block schedule: Strategies for teaching in extended periods of time. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
    • Canady, R. L., Rettig, M. D. (1995). Block scheduling: A catalyst for change in high school. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Marshak, D. (1997). Action research on block scheduling. Larchmont, N.Y.: Eye on Education.
    • Morrow, L. M. (2003). Organizing & managing the language arts block: A professional development guide. New York, NY: The Guildford Press.
    • Cunningham, P. & Allington, R. (2003). Classrooms that work: They can all read and write. Lebanon, IN: Pearson Education.
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
     
     
      
      
      
    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block
    Summary:

    An Example of the 90 Minute Reading Block

    Publication Date:2005
    URL:http://www.justreadflorida.com/90-minute-chart.asp
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure, Instruction, Literacy
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    Think outside the clock: Create time for professional learning.
    Summary:

    This article presents suggestions about creating staff development time in schools.  The author describes three ways a school district in Marietta, GA creatively found time for their  staff development, then also presents issues and suggestions offered by consultants who have worked with school systems on this issue. School administrators and teachers can use this article as a way to start discussions on finding staff development time in their schools.

    Publication Date:2002
    URL:http://www.nsdc.org/library/publications/tools/tools8-02rich.cfm
    Content Type:
    Staff Development, Time, Structure
    Grade Level:Elementary School, Middle School, High School
      
      
    High Schools That Work: Findings from the 1996 and 1998 Assessments
    Summary:This report shows that in a two-year period between 1996 and 1998, High Schools That Work sites significantly increased the percentages of students in their senior classes who met the HSTW achievement goals in mathematics, science and reading and the percentages of students in their senior classes who completed the HSTW-recommended program of study. The report was prepared by the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) of Research Triangle Park, N.C., for the U.S. Department of Education, Planning and Evaluation Service. It contains many tables and appendices based on the data.
    Publication Date:April 2001
    URL:http://www.sreb.org/programs/hstw/ResearchReports/RTI_study.pdf
    Grade Level:High School
    Reform Elements:Restructuring, School Models
    PBS: Continuum of Behavior Support

    The framework of PBS is a continuum of support from universal to individualized support. With universal school-wide management strategies in place, most students, 80-90%, function within the daily structure of school without major behavior concerns. Although some students require additional support, all students benefit from universal procedures and expectations that are clear and consistent and are efficiently used across all school settings, staff, and students.

    Some students, 5-15%, are at risk for behavior concerns. In order to meet the behavioral needs of these students, targeted or specialized group-based interventions are integrated within the school environment in addition to the universal procedures.

    There are also a few students, 1-7%, who exhibit chronic or severe behavior concerns that are unresponsive to universal and group based supports. These students need intense individualized support beyond the universal and specialized support levels.

    When effective behavioral support is provided at all levels across school-wide, non-classroom, classroom, and individual student systems, comprehensive support is established while providing proactive procedures for preventing serious problem behaviors.

    continuum diagram

    Click each level of the diagram above for an expanded description, or click: Universal Systems, Intervention Support, or Individualized Support.